Book Launch for Behold What You Are — Thursday April 22 at 8 PM Eastern

All are invited to join the Zoom for the launch of Behold What You Are: Becoming the Body of Christ.
Thursday, Aprill 22
8 PM Eastern

Here’s the Zoom link.

 

Written primarily from her experience as Vicar of the Church of the Advocate, this book is in many ways the story of the People of the Advocate, formed by liturgy to be the Body of Christ, given for the world.

Advocate Sheryl Cornett will serve as host for the Launch, which will include readings from the book as well as shared experiences and learnings from a panel of current and former Advocates: Nathan Kirkpatrick, Sadie Koppelberger, Gabe Lamazares and John Wall.

You’re invited to have a celebratory beverage on hand for the Zoom reception following.

Please join us!

 

The Vicarage Presents… Women of the Cloud

Vicar of the Advocate, Lisa Fischbeck, along with producer Grace Camblos, has started a new short video program called The Vicarage. Filmed on location at the Advocate, these videos share stories and prayers of the Church.

In our first season, we focus on the Women of the Cloud, those women who are commemorated by The Episcopal Church and featured in the newly published book, “A Great Cloud of Witnesses.” It’s in part to fill the loss of the midweek Eucharist in this season of COVID, and also to share the stories about our ancestors in the faith that are usually heard only by those who can make it to the midweek Eucharist.

This week in Episode 16 we look back over Season One and explore what it means to be descendants in faith of these inspiring women. And we look forward to Season Two: The Saints Among Us!

In Episode 15 we remember Frances Perkins, the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet, whose faith inspired her to work for more just labor laws and to advocate for workers’ rights throughout her life:

Previous episodes:

  • Vida Dutton Scudder, an American educator, author, and social gospel movement activist
  • Brigid, one of Ireland’s patron saints, an early Irish Christian nun, abbess, and founder of several monasteries of nuns, including that of Kildare in Ireland
  • Margery Kempe, an English Christian mystic, known for writing through dictation “The Book of Margery Kempe,” a work considered by some to be the first autobiography in the English language
  • Thecla, a saint of the early Christian church, follower of Paul the Apostle, and a martyr and missionary (watch out for the ravenous seals!)
  • Hildegard of Bingen, a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, visionary, and polymath. One of the best-known composers of sacred monophony, many also consider her the founder of scientific natural history in Germany
  • Amelia Jenks Bloomer, an American women’s rights advocate. As the first woman to own, operate and edit a newspaper for women, she helped reform women’s clothing, popularizing the style known as… bloomers!
  • Constance and Her Companions, Episcopal nuns who braved the 1878 yellow fever outbreak in Memphis, TN, to care for the city’s sick and dying
  • Prudence Crandall, a schoolteacher and activist who ran the first school for black girls in the United States
  • Artemisia Bowden, an African-American educator and civil rights activist who played a pivotal role in founding St. Philip’s College in San Antonio
  • Florence Nightingale, a woman inspired by her faith to care for the sick, injured, and dying, and who transformed nursing into the modern field of medicine that we know today
  • Catherine Winkworth, a 19th century poet and advocate for women’s education who translated some of today’s best-loved hymns from German into English
  • Mary, Martha, and the Ordination of Women: friends of Jesus who showed us how we can love God and each other — and the first Episcopal women ordained to the priesthood
  • Sojourner Truth, who preached against slavery, for the women’s vote, and, ahead of her time, against capital punishment
  • Macrina, fourth century monastic and writer…and older sister to two very smart brothers

Subscribe to the Advocate’s YouTube Channel to get new episodes every Wednesday!

Advocates Helping Our Neighbors in Need

As we seek to find our way in these strange times, that way is off balanced if we don’t also respond to our neighbors in need. Many of you are already finding ways to do this. Here are some ways you can help via The Advocate.
Because we aren’t taking up our weekly food offerings on Sundays, we will be contributing to the food pantry at the Interfaith Council via bell tower drop-offs.


The Advocate Garden yielded 2 1/2 gallon bags  of sugar snap peas , one bag of chard, and 6 or so bags of lettuce, delivered to the IFC

As you are out shopping pick up any of the following to donate. You can leave food donations in the Advocate Chapel bell tower.

  1. Canned meat (spam, tuna, salmon, vienna sausages)
  2. Pork and beans
  3. Baked beans
  4. Pinto beans
  5. Chili
  6. Ramen
  7. Pasta
  8. Peanut butter
  9. Jelly
  10. Snacks
  11. Cereal
  12. Spaghetti
  13. Toilet paper
  14. Shampoo
  15. Liquid soap
  16. Coffee/tea/hot chocolate
  17. Juice
  18. Fresh or frozen chicken or turkey for take-out meals
  19. Olive oil and butter for take-out meal preparation

In the weeks ahead, we will once again collect food to assist the good people of the Rogers/Eubanks Neighborhood Association in collecting food for those in need in the neighborhood. They will supplement food donations with food purchased at discount in order to provide three meals to 250 different households. 

Screenside Chats Sundays at 11:15

Questions emerge out of this surreal time of life and faith and church. We can’t answer them all. But we can talk about a lot of them!

On Sundays after the 10 AM liturgy, the Vicar hosts a “Screenside Chat” 11:15 – noon.

Conversations started with what we miss most and why, and moved on to matters of race and racism, the election tide, homelessness in our region, then back to covidtimes. In Lent we will explore who we are as a faith community and begin to explore our land and the connections between land and people.

Join us as you are led.

ChurchLands

In 2018, the Episcopal Church’s General Convention passed Resolution D053: Stewardship of Creation with Church-Owned Lands, which affirmed that church-owned land holds the potential for ecological benefit, community healing, and ministries of discipleship and evangelism. The newly formed ChurchLands initiative seeks to inspire and equip church leaders who are tasked with the care of church-owned land. 

With our 15 acres of land, and a commitment to be good stewards of that land, The Advocate seems like a good prospective participant in the program!

The vision of ChurchLands is to inspire and assist churches in stewarding land in a way that is faithful to the Gospel: integrating discipleship, ecology, justice, and health. In its pilot stage, ChurchLands will develop a small group of Christian leaders learning and working together on land use issues in their local contexts.

This cohort has been selected, but we can still be involved!

In the seasons ahead, ChurchLands will offer regular in-person gatherings to explore Scripture, practical theology, and land use issues for Christians who care for land. An online ChurchLands Network will serve as a national platform to inspire and engage this work through network building and resource-sharing. The ChurchLands initiative will be managed through Plainsong Farm & Ministry in Rockford, Michigan, a ministry in the Episcopal Diocese of Western Michigan. 

Folks can participate by connecting with current cohort members, participating in webinars, or as prayer partners. For more information, contact Emma Lietz Bilecky emmalietz@gmail.com.

House Dinner — now without dinner — Thursday evenings at 7 PM

The Thursday House Dinners (now on Zoom and without the dinner….) provide a place of shared food, shared stories, and deep fellowship. The hosts provide an atmosphere of welcome, mutual care, and good humor.

House Dinner is a time of togetherness over a shared meal, concluding with an invitation to respond to an open-ended prompt, often about an idea or concept (e.g., “shelter,” “grace,” “Christmas spirit”).

You don’t need to bring anything but yourself. All are welcome any time. If you are able, it helps if you can let the organizers know you are coming and if you can contribute food to the meal, so they can be sure the food and setting are gracious and welcoming.

The House Dinner takes place on Thursday, night at 7 PM.

Contact Debbie Wuliger <debrawuliger@aol.com> if you want to join in the Zoom or if you have any questions.

Advocate long sleeve t-shirts available

Our Bishop, Sam Rodman, and our Vicar, Lisa Fischbeck, enjoy the shirt in red and in grey.

Advocate 15th Anniversary  t-shirts in grey or red are available in kids small and medium, and in adults small, medium and large.

On the front, the shirts read:
ADVOCATE
BE THE NOUN
DO THE VERB

On the back, the shirts read:
Welcoming people of every kind of household and at every stage of life and faith and doubt since 2003 – The Advocate. (and there’s an image of the Advo-cat, Smoke)

A donation of $15 is requested for each shirt.
Cash or write checks to ECOTA, with T-shirt in the memo line.

Shirts are available at the Church House, especially on Sundays.

For an additional $7.50 plus you address, we will send one to you!

You can order in two ways:

  1. Online. Send your mailing information and your size to:
    The Advocate Church Office <theadvocatechurch@gmail.com>
    Then go to our online donation page and donate $22,50 (or more!). For convenience, use the general operating fund designation. We will assume that gifts of $22.50 are intended for t-shirt purchase and mailing. But will need an email let us know where to send it!
  2. Send a check and your size in the mail to:
    Advocate t-shirts
    8410 Merin Road
    Chapel Hill, NC  27516

 

 

Glory Bees! A Piedmont Patch Project

On Friday, April 6 a hive of 12,000 bees were installed in their new hive on the north side of the Advocate Pond.

We can learn about bees, bee keeping, and the Advocate Church bees in particular, by following the blog, Glory Bees, found here.

 

 

Blog posts include:
An Introduction
The Queen
Pollen and Plants
New Digs!

A post for National Pollinator Week posted August 4)
Sugar Shakin (posted August 6)
Time to Treat (posted August 8)

For more about the Piedmont Patch, look here.

 

 

The Piedmont Patch Project

img_7929The Piedmont Patch Project: Restoring Native Flora and Fauna, One Patch of Piedmont at a Time

The people of the Episcopal Church of the Advocate have a dream. Since moving onto our scruffy 15-acre site in 2014, we have been working to transform it into a place of hospitality, worship, and contemplation, and a regional resource for collaborative social ministry and the arts. In 2015, The Advocate began collaborating with individuals and organizations outside the church to host three “tiny homes” on our site, for individuals who would otherwise be homeless (PeeWeeHomes.org ). Now we are beginning a second collaboration, the Piedmont Patch Project, to restore native flora and fauna displaced by the rapid urbanization surrounding the property, and to cultivate keepers of Creation.

The Piedmont Patch project will transform five acres of our site into a food-producing and natural habitat, create a network of involved neighbors and provide numerous opportunities to educate and engage people of all ages and backgrounds. We believe that in deepening connections with creation and with our community, mindfully tending and keeping the land and teaching others to do the same, we will honor God.

20170628_195951We imagine the Advocate Pond and grounds enriched with diverse well-adapted native plants that will attract and nurture an array of wildlife, including butterflies, bees, birds, frogs, turtles, and small mammals. Surrounded by rapid urbanization, the Church of the Advocate’s acreage can serve as a sanctuary for homeless wildlife increasingly displaced by bulldozers, asphalt, and concrete. Over time, such native plantings require less maintenance than traditional ornamental plantings, most of which do not meet the needs of native wildlife.

The project has an educative component, engaging school children and graduate students and inviting all who are responsible for patches of Piedmont land to learn how to create vibrant native sanctuaries that serve rather than harm God’s creation. Ideally, we can lead other congregations and other neighborhoods to adopt this concept of native sanctuaries, building refuges of hope for native wildlife and havens of peace and beauty for humans one patch of piedmont (and beyond!) at a time. The Project will also include education on invasive exotic species and their removal — why it is important, how it contributes to sustainability.

IMG_8563The Piedmont Patch Project is grounded in a belief that the environment and our natural resources will be better sustained, and even thrive, as organizations and individuals work to cultivate one patch at a time. The Project is envisioned as a collaborative effort of the church, the town, the NC Botanical Gardens, and individuals with knowledge and skills to share, such as Cathy Bollinger of The Piedmont Gardener.

We hope the Piedmont Patch Project (like the Pee Wee Homes Collaborative) will serve as prototypes that can be scaled and replicated in a variety of church, public, and private settings.

Breaking News!!! The Advocate Awarded Stewardship of Creation Grant from The Episcopal Church!

Here’s and article about native and non-native wildflowers and bees.