Readers Roundtable 2nd Tuesdays at 7

IMG_0382The Readers Roundtable gathers the second Wednesday of the month, 7:00-8:30 PM in the Advocate House  to talk about a book selected by those who participated in the Roundtable the previous month. Books are largely fiction, but are not limited to fiction.
Books so far have included Rachel Held Evans’ Searching for Sunday, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Mary Doris Russell’s The Sparrow, and Mary Oliver’s Thirst, Leif Enger’s Peace Like a River, Wendell Berry’s A Place on Earth, and Louise Erdrich’s Last Report on the Miracles of Little No Horse.

Each month the conversation is open to everyone and their friends.

In the season ahead, here are the books that will be discussed:

Readers’ Roundtable – Fall ’19 – Spring ’20 Selections

Second Wednesday of the Month, 7:00-8:30 PM

On Zoom

Tuesday, October 13 at 7 PM we will gather to discuss Songs for the Forgotten: A Psychiatrist’s Record. It concerns the author’s many years treating psychiatric patients. See the Amazon synopsis below.

The book is not available on Amazon until October 20th, and I assume book stores don’t have it yet either. However, Julia has copies she will sell at a discounted price of $15. Email Julia at doctorjuliawb@gmail.com, and she will mail you a copy.
Amazon synopsis:

Songs for the Forgotten: A Psychiatrist’s Record combines pivotal moments from Julia Burns’s Southern upbringing in the 1970s with case histories accumulated through three decades of treating psychiatric patients, particularly those drowning in the cultural epidemic of child abuse. This book is her journal of rupture and return.

The reader will follow the author’s hard-won reconciliation. In telling panoply of stories, including her own, Burns argues for the interconnectedness of humanity: when one child is hurt, our humanity is violated, and we are all responsible for undoing that damage. If no one steps up to save children, to show them they are worth saving, the cycle of abuse will continue.

Songs for the Forgotten offers a strong practical component, providing information about trauma and healing. Burns illustrates how hope and wholeness can come from remembrance and telling.

Whether you’ve read the book or not, all are always welcome to join in the conversation!
For further information, contact Hilda Bukowski: hldscll2@gmail.com