News and Events

Electiontide Prayers

October 27- – November 4, Please join in The Episcopal Church’s  A Season of Prayer for An Election. 

Sunday, November 1
at 10 AM, we will gather online to celebrate the Feast of All Saints. Please plan to join in this principal feast of our liturgical calendar and of our hearts.
at 4 PM: The Episcopal Church invites us to join Holding on to Hope – A National Service for Healing and Wholeness, with the Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, online from the National Cathedral.
at 8:30 PM. Online Compline.

Election Eve, Monday, November 2
at 7 PM, The Advocate will gather online to pray for our community and our nation and our election. 
at 8:30 PM. Online Compline.

Tuesday, November 3 Election Day
at 8:30 PM. Online Compline.

Wednesday, November 4 the day after the election, but likely before the results are in, The Advocate will gather to pray some more.
at noon. Pondside Eucharist
at 8:30 PM. Online Compline.

Thursday, November 5
at 8:30 PM.
Online Compline.

Friday, November 6
at 8:30 PM. Online Compline.

Saturday, November 7
at 10 AM, possibly still before the election results are in, we will gather at the Advocate site for a safe distanced Site Stewardship Day. We have three picnic tables to put together, some briars to clear from the dam for pondside worship expansion possibilities ahead, and some wood chips to be spread. Stay tuned for more information!
at 8:30 PM. Online Compline.

Confronting Racism

As Christians who believe that every human being is created in the image of God and who are called to respect the dignity of every human being, we need to confront the racial inequity in our hearts and in our nation. There are lots of resources and opportunities for thinking about these things, and the list is growing daily. To help provide some focus for our conversations at the Advocate, here are some recommendations:

First, we continue to work with the local chapter of the NAACP to help get out the vote for this year’s elections. If you are able to participate in phone banking in the weeks ahead, please contact Elizabeth Young.

You can join in texting to get out the vote in North Carolina in partnership with Reclaim Our Vote and NC NAACP. The contact will be done through your computer, not your phone. When you open this google doc you will see options for text message training: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScfWAMtOjgyfl3zRyeNz1RxLDr9kJprcvfySMe4WhoqenF6Hg/viewform?usp=sf_link

Second, we are hoping that half of the adults of the Advocate will participate in an REI (Racial Equity Institute) workshop, either Groundwater or Phase One. While many of the workshops ahead are already full, we are keeping an eye out for late fall. If you are interested in attending an REI workshop, check the partnership websites listed here for more information and to register.

Available REI Groundwater trainings (3 hour intro or refresher)
All are virtual. Price is $40-$45, depending on who is sponsoring.

Available REI Phase 1 sessions (2-day)
All listed below are virtual. Price is $295 for an individual, $275 per person for a group, $175 student.

The REI website (https://www.racialequityinstitute.com) has most of these options listed as well as others around the country, but does not include all the options (Alamance does not have theirs listed, for example). REI also has a list of all their partnership organizations, and you may find other options for the training by clicking on their links. 

If you need finical assistance, please contact the Vicar at vicar@TheAdvocateChurch.org.

Third, we are continuing a series of book and film conversations in the season ahead.
In September, we met to discuss White Fragility, Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism written by Robin DiAngelo about race relations in the United States.

Sunday, October 25, we will on Zoom at 7 PM to discuss Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents, by Isabel Wilkerson. If you would like to participate in that discussion, please contact vicar@theAdvocateChurch.org.


Let us commit to praying and working together in the seasons ahead.

The Vicarage Presents… Women of the Cloud

Vicar of the Advocate, Lisa Fischbeck, along with producer Grace Camblos, has started a new short video program called The Vicarage. Filmed on location at the Advocate, these videos share stories and prayers of the Church.

In our first season, we focus on the Women of the Cloud, those women who are commemorated by The Episcopal Church and featured in the newly published book, “A Great Cloud of Witnesses.” It’s in part to fill the loss of the midweek Eucharist in this season of COVID, and also to share the stories about our ancestors in the faith that are usually heard only by those who can make it to the midweek Eucharist.

This week in Episode 15 we remember Frances Perkins, the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet, whose faith inspired her to work for more just labor laws and to advocate for workers’ rights throughout her life:

In Episode 14 we lift up Vida Dutton Scudder, an American educator, author, and social gospel movement activist:

Previous episodes:

  • Brigid, one of Ireland’s patron saints, an early Irish Christian nun, abbess, and founder of several monasteries of nuns, including that of Kildare in Ireland
  • Margery Kempe, an English Christian mystic, known for writing through dictation “The Book of Margery Kempe,” a work considered by some to be the first autobiography in the English language
  • Thecla, a saint of the early Christian church, follower of Paul the Apostle, and a martyr and missionary (watch out for the ravenous seals!)
  • Hildegard of Bingen, a German Benedictine abbess, writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, visionary, and polymath. One of the best-known composers of sacred monophony, many also consider her the founder of scientific natural history in Germany
  • Amelia Jenks Bloomer, an American women’s rights advocate. As the first woman to own, operate and edit a newspaper for women, she helped reform women’s clothing, popularizing the style known as… bloomers!
  • Constance and Her Companions, Episcopal nuns who braved the 1878 yellow fever outbreak in Memphis, TN, to care for the city’s sick and dying
  • Prudence Crandall, a schoolteacher and activist who ran the first school for black girls in the United States
  • Artemisia Bowden, an African-American educator and civil rights activist who played a pivotal role in founding St. Philip’s College in San Antonio
  • Florence Nightingale, a woman inspired by her faith to care for the sick, injured, and dying, and who transformed nursing into the modern field of medicine that we know today
  • Catherine Winkworth, a 19th century poet and advocate for women’s education who translated some of today’s best-loved hymns from German into English
  • Mary, Martha, and the Ordination of Women: friends of Jesus who showed us how we can love God and each other — and the first Episcopal women ordained to the priesthood
  • Sojourner Truth, who preached against slavery, for the women’s vote, and, ahead of her time, against capital punishment
  • Macrina, fourth century monastic and writer…and older sister to two very smart brothers

Subscribe to the Advocate’s YouTube Channel to get new episodes every Wednesday!

Liturgy Guide for Ordinary Time I 2020

Image result for the church of the advocate chapel hill

GATHERING

People’s Prelude

Welcome

A period of silence is kept. During this time we prepare ourselves in heart and in mind to worship God together.

In the silence – Candles are lit. 
What We Need is Here, sung five  times via virtual choir video.

More silence.

Gathering Hymn – via video or led a cappella by cantor.

Opening Acclamation            
Presider          In the name of the one, holy, and Living God 
People            Glory to God for ever and ever. Amen.

The Penitential Order
Jesus said, “The first commandment is this: Hear, O Israel: The Lord your God is the only Lord. Love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength. The second is this: Love your neighbor as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.”    Mark 12:29-31

Confession     [from Enriching Our Worship]
Presider          Let us confess oursins against God and our neighbor.      

After a short silence for reflection, all pray together:

All                  God of all mercy, we confess that we have sinned against you, opposing your will in our lives. We have denied your goodness in each other, in ourselves, and in the world you have created. We repent of the evil that enslaves us, the evil we have done, and the evil done on our behalf. Forgive, restore, and strengthen us through our Savior Jesus Christ, that we may abide in your love and serve only your will.

Absolution      [New Zealand Book of Common Prayer]
Priest              Through the cross of Christ, God have mercy on you, pardon you,  and set you free. Know that you are forgiven, and be at peace. God strengthen you in all goodness and keep you in life eternal.             

All                   Amen. 

Song of Praise

Trisagian (spoken)

Presider          Holy God, Holy and Mighty, Holy Immortal One
All                   Have mercy on us.

Presider          Holy God, Holy and Mighty, Holy Immortal One
All                   Have mercy on us.

Presider          Holy God, Holy and Mighty, Holy Immortal One
All                   Have mercy on us.

Or Gloria (sung)

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Collect of the Day

Presider          The Lord be with you.
People            And also with you.
Presider          Let us pray. 

The presider prays the Collect of the day, and in response, the people say:Amen.

LITURGY OF THE WORD

The Lessons

First Reading 

At the end of each reading, the lector says, “Hear what the Spirit is saying to God’s people,” to which the people respond, “Thanks be to God.” 

The Psalm (Read by a reader. All are invited to read along while muted.)

Second Reading

Sequence Hymn

Verse 1 before the reading of the Gospel. Other verses following the reading of the Gospel, unless it is a pre-recording of the entire hymn, in which case it will all be sung before the reading of the Gospel.

The Gospel     

Before the reading of the Gospel

      Presider      The Holy Gospel of our Lord (Savior) Jesus Christ according to…

     People        Glory to you, Lord Christ.

After the reading of the Gospel 

     Presider      The Gospel of the Lord.
     People        Praise to you, Lord Christ.

Sequence Hymn         Remaining verses are sung, if they haven’t all been sung before the reading of the Gospel.

The Sermon

Second Reading

Sequence Hymn
Verse 1 before the reading of the Gospel. Other verses following the reading of the Gospel, unless it is a pre-recording of the entire hymn, in which case it will all be sung before the reading of the Gospel.

The Gospel     

Before the reading of the Gospel
Presider      The Holy Gospel of our Lord (Savior) Jesus Christ according to…
People        Glory to you, Lord Christ.

After the reading of the Gospel 
Presider      The Gospel of the Lord.
People        Praise to you, Lord Christ.

Sequence Hymn         Remaining verses are sung, if they haven’t all been sung before the reading of the Gospel.

The Sermon

The Nicene Creed (spoken by all with all unmuted)

We believe in one God, The Father, the Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, Of all that is, seen and unseen.  We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, The only Son of God, Eternally begotten of the Father,God from God, Light from Light,  True God from true God, Begotten, not made, Of one Being with the Father.Through him all things were made.  For us and for our salvationHe came down from heaven: By the power of the Holy Spirit He became incarnate from the Virgin Mary, And was made man.For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; He suffered death and was buried. On the third day he rose again In accordance with the Scriptures;  He ascended into heavenAnd is seated at the right hand of the Father. He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, And his kingdom will have no end.  We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,Who proceeds from the Father and the Son. Who with the Father and the Son is worshiped and glorified.Who has spoken through the Prophets. We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.We look for the resurrection of the dead,and the life of the world to come. Amen.

The Prayers of the People                                                 

The Leader reads the following introduction:

Leader            Let us now offer our prayers and thanksgiving to God. After each bidding, I invite you to share your prayers with the whole congregation, so that we may join our prayers to yours. Before we pray together, let us, in silence, ask the Spirit to bring to our consciousness those things for which we should pray.

The Leader then offers each bidding.  In the silence following each bidding, the people are invited to share their prayers, either silently or aloud. At the end of each intercession, the leader says:

Leader                       Lord, in your mercy
People respond      Hear our prayer. 

The biddings follow this order:

I bid your prayers for God’s people throughout the world and for the universal church and its leaders;  

I bid your prayers for peace and justice;  

I bid your prayers for our nation and our state, and for all persons in positions  of authority; 

I bid your prayers for the needs and concerns of our counties and our cities;  

I bid your prayers for this congregation, for those who suffer and for those in any kind of trouble; 

 I bid your prayers for those who have died;

I bid your prayers of thanksgivings to God.

The Lord’s Prayer

Presider          As our Savior Christ has taught us we now pray.
All                   Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your Name,

Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us.
Save us from the time of trial, and deliver us from evil.
For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours,
Now and for ever. Amen.

Collect Song: All Shall Be Well. Lead by the virtual choir.

We Go Forth

Announcements and Anniversaries

Presider:
May the Peace of God, which passes all understanding keep your hearts and minds in the knowledge and love of God, and of his son, Jesus Christ our Lord, and the Blessing of God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit, be with you and those whom you love, this day and forever.
Amen

Or (from A New Zealand Prayer Book)

Good friends,
Go forth into the world in peace;
be of good courage;
Render to no one evil for evil.
Hold fast that which is good;
strengthen the fainthearted;
help the afflicted;
honor and respect the dignity of everyone;
and rejoice in the power of the Spirit
In us,
and beyond us all.
and the Blessing of God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit, be with you and those whom you love, this day and forever.
Amen

Sending forth song

Presider or Deacon    
Go in Peace, to love and serve the Lord.
People             Thanks be to God. 

Advocate to host “We Cried Power” Film Watch and Panel

We invite you to join us on Zoom SundayJune 14, from 7:00-8:30 PM for a screening of We Cried Power — the powerful new documentary film about the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival (PPC). PPC is an initiative started by The Rev. Dr. William Barber, former head of the NCNAACP, to carry on the fusion anti-poverty work begun by Dr. Martin Luther King shortly before his assassination.

The 45-minute film will be followed by a panel discussion facilitated by the Rev. Lisa Fischbeck, Church of the Advocate, with Chapel Hill-Carrboro NAACP President Anna Richards, Diane Robertson, Chapel Hill-Carrboro NAACP Political Action Chair, and Jennifer Bremer, NC League of Women Voters State Board Member. 

If you are interested in joining us, please contact Elizabeth@elizabethadams.com 

Click here to watch the trailer: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/wecriedpower

see also: https://www.wecriedpower.com/

Program sponsors:
The Episcopal Church of the Advocate, Lead Sponsor
Chapel Hill – Carrboro NAACP, Political Action Committee, Co-Sponsor
WILPF Triangle (Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom), Co-Sponsor
League of Women Voters, Orange, Durham, and Chatham Counties, Co-Sponsor

Even if you aren’t able to join us Sunday, we hope you will register for the Digital event – National Poor People’s Moral March on Washington on June 20, 2020. Please click this link to RSVP for June 20, 2020, a Digital Gathering. To volunteer with the PPC, email volunteers@poorpeoplescampaign.org

Pentecost 2020 Sermon by the Vicar, Lisa Fischbeck

Here’s the video link. (13 minutes)

Here’s the text.

Pentecost 2020
The Advocate on Zoom
May 31, 2020

In the Name of the creating, restring and transforming God,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Fire

It brings comfort to a cold night.
It lends an air of celebration and joy on days of festivity.
It can serve as a conduit for good reading, a nap, a bit of romance perhaps.
Come heavenly comforter,
Spirit of Peace.

But it isn’t wintertime here in North Carolina this Pentecost Sunday.
And the fire of the Spirit is not all sweet comfort.

Instead, we are perched on a Sunday after a week of civil unrest across our nation.
A week in our nation when as much as ever we need a voice 
of compassion, equanimity, calm and strength 
emanating from our nation’s leadership.
And what we are getting instead is …
Well, what we are getting instead is something else.
So we turn to our God.

Fire

It refines and purifies,
It cleanses us of impurity.
And I’m not speaking here of what might be considered physical impurities,
Rather the impurities of mind, heart and soul,
Impurities such as racism,
That get in the way of our knowing and making known
God justice, God’s mercy, God’s Peace and God’s Love.

Fire.

I am grateful to Nancy Trueblood for organizing our poly-lingual reading of the story of Pentecost from the book of Acts.

So that we can experience anew the chaos and the celebration of many languages, many people,

And with the translation before us on the PowerPoint provided by Nathan,

we, too, can understand what is being said in languages that are not our own.

We need to remember that the Christian Pentecost story 

started with the disciples all holed up in fear and uncertainty.

They’d already been through the crucifixion 

and all the fear and uncertainty that had caused.

They’d already been through the experience of resurrection and all the sweet relief and excitement it brought on,

They’d already been with Jesus among them for a season,

Setting their hearts at ease,

Challenging them anew,

Causing them to realize that things were not ever going to be the same.

That there was a “new normal” indeed.

But then Jesus disappeared again.

Ascended.

They saw him go.

Sure, he offered comforting words before he left.

But still,

Here they were again,

Holed up in one place together,

Filled with fear and uncertainty.

Not knowing what the future would bring.

What the nextnew normal would be.
Sound familiar?

When suddenly, 
there was the sound of a rushing and violent wind,

Think hurricane or tornado.

There was the sound of a rushing and violent wind.

And then the appearance of tongues,

“As of fire”, the story goes.

And those tongues as of fire landed on each of them.

None other than the Holy Spirit was filling them, 

and filling the room.

The next thing they knew,

They were able to speak and understand in languages they did not know before.

And they were united,

Not only with each other,

But with all the crowds gathered on the streets outside their window.

Because everyone could understand everyone.

It was as if there were a universal language.

No.

It was that there wasa universal language.

The language of the Holy Spirit.

Fire. 

You may have heard in recent days

A recording of a speech delivered by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

In 1967.

It was a speech he gave against the backdrop of rioting that rocked our cities that summer.

He called it “the other America.”

One America, King said,  
is overflowing with the milk of prosperity and the honey of opportunity. 
This America is the habitat of millions of people who have food and material necessities for their bodies; 
and culture and education for their minds; 
and freedom and human dignity for their spirits. 

This sounds like most of the people most of us know, doesn’t it….

But tragically and unfortunately,King went on… 
there is another America. 
This other America has a daily ugliness about it that constantly transforms the ebulliency of hope into the fatigue of despair. …
In this America people are poor by the millions. …

In the speech, King goes on to underscore his commitment to non-violence.

And he also works to help those who would listen

To understand why the rioting was happening.

A riot is the language of the unheard.He said.
A riot is the language of the unheard.

And what is it that America has failed to hear? Among other things, Kings said:
…it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality, and humanity.

And so, King went on, 

in a real sense our nation’s summers of riots 
are caused by our nation’s winters of delay. 
And as long as America postpones justice, 

we stand in the position of having these recurrences of violence and riots over and over again. 

A riot is the language of the unheard.

A riot is the language of anger, yes,

Anger over constant, persistent unending injustice and oppression.

It is the language of a people who can find no other way to be seen and be heard.
And here on this day of Pentecost, 2020,

We cannot miss the significance of the fire,

As buildings burn, as cars burn, as fires burn in the souls of the downtrodden.

The fire of Pentecost lit on the disciples

And empowered them,

Not only to speak and understand languages they did not previously know,

But also to share the message of God

To all the then known world.

That’s power. 

Changing a group of frightened people,

Uncertain of what the future would bring,

Into go-getters of the highest form.

Fire

It is in the spirit of unity and in celebration of the fire of Pentecost

That you and I are wearing red this morning.

You, and I and Jesus. (point)

By wearing red, 

We are,

At least at some level,

taking the fire of Pentecost ontoourselves and  intoourselves this day.

Like a mantle.

Do you feel it?

What does mean to carry the mantle of Pentecost?

What does it mean really, to wear red on this day?
Certainly it is fun and unifying and joyful,

And that is good.

Certainly it reminds us of the comfort and Peace that the Holy Spirit brings.

That’s good, too.

But we all know that thisPentecost,

This Pentecost 2020

Is a Pentecost amidst a covid crisis that has laid bare the economic disparities of our land.

It is a Pentecost amid another round of riots rising out of the atrocity of our nation’s long history of racism.

Will we let our common language include the language of the unheard?

Will we seize this Pentecost moment in our nation and in our lives?

I know, I know it is hard to know what to do.

What can we do?

Especially in these covid times.

What can we do?

Well, I want to make three suggestions.

Three things we can do, and all they will take

For now

is our time.

No more than 4 hours and 9 minutes of our time.

First, if you haven’t seen it already,

do a search and find a video link to the 9-minute video of the arrest and murder of George Floyd.

Watch it. Watch all 9 minutes of it.

And realize that the abuse of black human beings,

Especially black men, 

That we associate with mid-19thcentury America, 

is still very much a part of our nation’s way.

Second,

Tune into MSNBC tonight at 9 PM

 And watch Poverty and the Pandemic.

A discussion with Joy Reid and William Barber.

Come to understand more fully the language of the unheard.
Black, brown and white.

Third,

Participate in The Mass Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March 

on Saturday, June 20.

It’ll happen at 10 am or 6 PM, or on Saturday, June 20.

Stay tuned in for all, or if need be just some of the two hours.

It may get tedious.

It may feel repetitive.

Stay with it.

However inconvenient it may be to us,

  1. It is asking a whole lot less time that getting on a bus and going to Washington DC for the day, which is what we were planning before covid 19 hit.
  2. Whatever inconvenience it entails is not nearly as inconvenient as the inconvenience experienced by the poor and the oppressed in our society every single day.

On Sunday, June 21, we will talk about it in our screenside chat.

This may not feel like enough, and it isn’t.

But I offer these three things we can do 

Because we can do them,

to share in the language of the unheard.

Maybe we can consider it our Pentecost pledge.

As we prayed earlier in our in this liturgy:
Officiant:     If Christ’s disciples keep silent

All:             These stones would shout aloud.   

We cannot keep silent.

Fire. 

See the fires of this day, 

Feel the burn, (that’s burn, with a u)

Feeling it in our red clothing, in our zoom, in our national news,

See the fire, feel the fire, share the fire.

until allGod’s children can come to know

The language of the unheard 

and they are unheard no more.

Until allGod’s children can come to know

the language of God’s justice, God’s mercy,
God’s Peace and God’s love.                                                                                                         

Amen.

Advocates Helping Our Neighbors in Need

As we seek to find our way in these strange times, that way is off balanced if we don’t also respond to our neighbors in need. Many of you are already finding ways to do this. Here are some ways you can help via The Advocate.
Because we aren’t taking up our weekly food offerings on Sundays, we will be contributing to the food pantry at the Interfaith Council via bell tower drop-offs.


The Advocate Garden yielded 2 1/2 gallon bags  of sugar snap peas , one bag of chard, and 6 or so bags of lettuce, delivered to the IFC

As you are out shopping pick up any of the following to donate. You can leave food donations in the Advocate Chapel bell tower.

  1. Canned meat (spam, tuna, salmon, vienna sausages)
  2. Pork and beans
  3. Baked beans
  4. Pinto beans
  5. Chili
  6. Ramen
  7. Pasta
  8. Peanut butter
  9. Jelly
  10. Snacks
  11. Cereal
  12. Spaghetti
  13. Toilet paper
  14. Shampoo
  15. Liquid soap
  16. Coffee/tea/hot chocolate
  17. Juice
  18. Fresh or frozen chicken or turkey for take-out meals
  19. Olive oil and butter for take-out meal preparation

In the weeks ahead, we will once again collect food to assist the good people of the Rogers/Eubanks Neighborhood Association in collecting food for those in need in the neighborhood. They will supplement food donations with food purchased at discount in order to provide three meals to 250 different households. 

Jesus the Lord is Risen

The Advocate Virtual Choir is expanding! Working towards a choir of the whole. Here is our “song of praise” for Eastertide. All are invited to sing along!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLCbi6jLP5Q&feature=youtu.be

Surrexit Dominos Vere!
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Surrexit Christus Hodie!
Alleluia! Alleluia!

Jesus the Lord is risen!
Alleluia! Alleluia!
Jesus the Lord is risen today!
Alleluia! Alleluia!

Screenside Chats Sundays at 11:15

Questions emerge out of this surreal time of life and faith and church. We can’t answer them all. But we can talk about a lot of them!

Starting Sunday, April 26, the Vicar will host a “Screenside Chat” following the 10 AM liturgy. 11:15 – noon.

Virtual Coffee Hour will continue at the same time for those who want to connect with one another and get to know each other better.

The first week we will talk about the Eucharist and why we aren’t celebrating it in this “stay at home” season. This may take more than one conversation!

Future conversations will include what we miss most and why, when will we feel safe enough to return to the chapel together, what is a blessing and can we get one over the internet, is there anything that only the clergy can do and why, how is God calling us to respond …. Also, we will explore some of the ethical and theological concerns emerging from the coronavirus.

Join us as you are led.

All Who Hunger Gather Gladly

Prepared by an Advocate Virtual Choir for Maundy Thursday, 2020.

You that yearn for days of fullness, click here.
Scroll below for the full text.

“All who hunger, gather gladly; holy manna is our bread. Come from wilderness and wandering. Here, in truth, we will be fed. You that yearn for days of fullness, all around us is our food. Taste and see the grace eternal. Taste and see that God is good.

All who hunger, never strangers; seeker, be a welcome guest. Come from restlessness and roaming. Here, in joy, we keep the feast. We that once were lost and scattered in communion’s love have stood. Taste and see the grace eternal. Taste and see that God is good.

All who hunger, sing together; Jesus Christ is living bread. Come from loneliness and longing. Here, in peace, we have been led. Blest are those who from this table live their lives in gratitude. Taste and see the grace eternal. Taste and see that God is good.”
Sylvia Dunstan (1955-1993)