Summer Discussion on The Sermon on the Mount, Sundays at 10 AM

Through the summer, Sarah McGiverin and Paul Marvin will be leading a discussion of the Sermon on the Mount.  We will meet Sunday mornings before the Eucharist, 10:00 – 10:50.

Each week we’ll read a portion of the sermon and discuss it together.

Whether you’re an old pro at Bible studies or you’re brand new to the Sermon on the Mount, you are invited to join in the study.

Blue Grass Mass Sunday at 11 AM

IMG_5756Sing and stomp along as the Advocate Acoustics lead us in a Blue Grass Mass this Sunday.
Blue Grass music is indigenous to the southeastern united states. It’s popularity in our region is reflected in numbers festivals held each year, from MerleFest to the Union Grove Old Time Fiddlers Convention.  So twice a year or so The Advocate brings this musical style to our worship. Now part of our intended “Traditioned Innovation” liturgy, Sundays at 11 AM.

Songs to include:
Jesus is On The Mainline
Leaning on the Everlasting Arms
Let The Mystery Be
Farther Along
I Have Found The Way

I’ll Fly Away

Sunday, June 17, at 11 AM.
Come on your own, or bring a friend!

 

Study of Hebrew Scripture Starting in September

Have you ever wanted to study the wonderful, diverse and rich Hebrew Scriptures more deeply, but you’ve found the cost  or time commitment of some programs prohibitive?  Beginning in September, the Rev. Lera Tyler is offering a nine-month study of the Hebrew Scripture, using as text: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible  (Fortress Press, Second Edition 2014) by John J. Collins.

Participants will meet at the Advocate weekly to study and reflect on the stories, poetry, and teachings of the Pentateuch, the Prophets, Psalms, Wisdom literature, and consider their relevance to us now.
If you are interested in exploring the possibility, please contact Lera Tyler. <lera.tyler@gmail.com>.

Reconstructing The Gospel: A Poor Peoples Campaign Conversation

The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call For Moral Revival begins 40 Days of Nonviolent Direct Action to stir the conscience of our country.

During these six weeks, The Advocate will offer a reading group for those interested in sustaining our analysis of whiteness and deepening our understanding of Christianity’s role in the history of American racism.

We will read local theologian Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove’s new book, Reconstructing The Gospel: Finding Freedom From Slaveholder Religion.

Two copies are available on loan from the Advocate library.
We will discuss the book on Wednesday nights from 7:15-8:15 (except June 13, which is. Reader’s Roundtable night). More info to come!

Seeing White: Teachable Moments in Eastertide

[A Teachable Moment takes place Sundays, 10:10 – 10:50 AM in The Advocate House.]
In this season of Easter, as we move within the extraordinary reality of resurrection, we will have a six-part series of Teachable Moments that we hope will renew our minds and inspire the work of our hands.
Many in our community hunger for a greater understanding of race as well as meaningful action toward racial equity. Mindful of this, a group of Advocates will be guiding us through a historical, political, and theological perspective on race, with a specific focus on the construction of whiteness. We will do so, in part, through listening to a podcast series entitled “Seeing White,” which is produced by Scene On Radio, a podcast from Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies.
Rather than attempt a reading group or a free-wheeling conversation on such a complex and sensitive topic, we will invite folks to listen to a specific episode of this series prior to the TM. These podcast episodes are short (usually about 30 minutes), and they provide excellent historical perspective alongside frank reflections and friendly conversations. We expect listening to this series will be a convenient and doable way for us all to share a frame of reference as we think together.
In addition to these TM’s, we are also planning informal dinners and movie screenings to offer more opportunities, and different spaces, for folks to talk and hang out.
Next Sunday (May 13th) we will be focusing our conversation on the final episode in the Scene On Radio podcast series ‘Seeing White.’ That is episode 14, ‘Transformation.’
You can access all episodes at the website http://podcast.cdsporch.org/seeing-white/ or through whatever podcast app you use. If there are any questions about how to access podcasts, please email CharlesRousseau10@gmail.com.
Thank you!

What Happens Easter “Day”?

What Happens Easter “Day”?  It begins Saturday after sunset….. 
[Holy Saturday at 10 AM, we gather in the chapel for a brief service of readings and prayers, to remember Jesus in the tomb and the Harrowing of Hell]
Saturday at 8 PM   The Paschal Fire and the Great Vigil of Easter (bring at bell or whistle)
Sunday at 9 AM      Easter Eucharist in the Chapel
Sunday at 10 AM    Festive Brunch and Easter Egg Hunt (Ham and rolls provided. As you are able, bring a dish to share. And if you want to collect hidden eggs, bring a basket!) 
Sunday at 11 AM    Easter Eucharist by the pond (bring a blanket or chair) 

According to our Gospel accounts, the resurrection took place in the dark of night with no witnesses. So for the Easter Vigil on Saturday night, we gather in the dark near the pond. We experience the excitement of the Light of Christ coming into the darkness as we light the Pashal fire, carry the Paschal candle in procession past kerosene soaked torches that burst into flame. Once in the Chapel, we hear the ancient Exultet chanted, and we keep vigil through the stories of creation and liberation. We remember our baptism through which we have been united with Christ, and we give the Paschal Shout, with bells and whistles, alleluias and a simple, celebratory dance.

Tradition has it, that the Eucharist of the Great Vigil of Easter is the principal Eucharist of the year, from which all the others are derived.
 
 Easter Morning, the celebration continues!

Easter Morning we celebrate the discovery of the resurrection – in the daylight — with beauty, joy, Eucharist. We’ve heard the story, now we live in the light of the resurrection. We cheer the ancient song: Christ is risen from the dead, trampling down death by death, and upon those in the tomb, bestowing life. And we dance.

Between the 9 AM and the 11 AM liturgies, we gather outside as the faithful community for fellowship and feast. Ham and rolls are provided. As you are able, please bring a festive dish to share. There will be an Easter egg hunt for the kids (yes, we know it is a pagan thing, but it sure is harmless and fun).
Please join us for any or all. You are very welcome at The Advocate!

What Happens Good Friday?

On Good Friday the Church re-members the day of the crucifixion of Jesus. At the Advocate we will do this with three distinct practices.

IMG_3090At noon we will walk the Via Crucis, the Way of the Cross through the Town of Carrboro. The traditional 14 stations of the Way will be reinterpreted for our time and place, starting at the Carrboro Town Hall, where “Jesus is condemned to die” and ending in the old Carrboro Cemetery, where Jesus is laid in the tomb. Mindful of our neighbors whose first language is Spanish, and of the tradition of the Via Crucis in Central and South America, we will offer our prayers and meditations in English and in Spanish.

At 6 PM we will gather in the Advocate Chapel, 8410 Merin Road in north Chapel Hill, for the Good Friday Liturgy from the Book of Common Prayer, with prayers, a homily, and hymns.

Burial Icon, Good Friday
Burial Icon, Good Friday

From 7 PM to 9 PM, we will hold the Good Friday Wake in the Chapel gathering as the friends of Jesus, remembering the one who has died. The time is divided into 30 minute segments. At 7PM we will have a simple soup supper. In each of the half hours that follow, we will have a time of readings, a time of conversation about Jesus, and a time of silent meditation. People can come and go on the half hour throughout the evening.

 

What Happens Maundy Thursday?

903630_10100328975028214_779556457_oOn the Thursday of Holy Week, also called Maundy Thursday, the Church universal remembers Jesus’ “last supper” with his disciples. Scripture tells us that they gathered in an “upper room” for the passover meal.  They feasted and enjoyed one another’s fellowship. The frescos of Da Vinci at the Vatican and of Ben Long in Glendale Springs, NC, capture the intimacy and the complexity of that night.
Jesus surprised them all, first by washing their feet, then by his strange words about the bread and the wine. The former practice is remembered with varying degrees of symbolism and formality by many congregations. The latter practice evolved quickly as the Eucharist, the Holy Communion, the Lord’s Supper. And on Maundy Thursday we re-member both events.
Another practice of Maundy Thursday is “the stripping of the altar”. In this, vessels and cloths, of books and of banners, are all removed from the altar and its surrounding space. And the processional cross is veiled in black. It is as though the resurrection never happened. Death is the end. We move toward Good Friday, woefully aware of the disciples’ abandonment, and even betrayal, of Jesus, saddened by our own “standing by” while that crucifixion continues in other forms today.
In the first ten years of the Advocate, we had neither land nor building of our own, and we developed our Holy Week liturgies in such a way as to allow us to enter into Jesus’ last week as a human being as best we could in our time and place. We said “Carrboro becomes Jerusalem”. And we rented the Fleming Lodge at Camp New Hope to be our “upper room”. Maundy Thursday at Camp New Hope quickly became a favorite event in the life of the Advocate.
Each year we gather in the lodge for a festive evening of Middle Eastern food. Fresh tulips on every table, with a chalice of wine. and a basket of pita. Vestry members and other lay leaders serve the tables, and after supper offer the foot washing. An acoustic band leads us in favorite songs: All Who Hunger Gather Gladly, The Servant Song, Ubi Caritas, and more. At the end of the evening we clear the table tops and then the room itself. The transition is made plain. And we gather in the dark on the porch to hear Psalm 22, stand in silence, then go our separate ways into the night.
It is a night of friendship and faith. It is also a night of hospitality. We encourage visitors and friends to come on over and join us.
6:30 – 8:30 PM. Fleming Lodge, Camp New Hope. (off highway 86, 3 miles north of the I40-86 interchange).
Please come and join us for an evening of food, song and prayer. All are welcome.

 

An Advocate Lenten Quiet Day at Spring Forth Farm March 10

The Church of the Advocate contemplative prayer group
invites you to share in a Lenten Quiet Day out at Megan and
Jonathan Leiss’ farm, Spring Forth Farm, in Hurdle Mills on

Saturday March 10 from 10-4pm

The day will largely be self-guided quiet time with opportunities to engage in light meditative garden work and fellowship. Feel free to come and go as you wish but please plan to share the noon meal with everyone. A potluck lunch will be shared at noon. In lieu of a donation to cover supplies, please bring a vegetarian/vegan dish to the potluck lunch.

Registration required as we can only host 15 folks. Please register by Wednesday March 7th.

Please come and join us in the quiet and beauty of Spring Forth Farm during this Lenten season.

For more information or to register email Megan at
leiss.megan@gmail.com

 

Lenten Study: Hanging By a Thread

411KA8IcUTL._SX316_BO1,204,203,200_Lent Study 2018

7:15 – 8:15PM     Wednesday Evenings

February 21, 28 and March 7, 14, 21

In the Advocate House

Everyone is invited to this year’s Lent study, focusing on Sam Well’s reflection on the Crucifixion entitled Hanging by a Thread: The Questions of the Cross.

Here’s the book’s Amazon blurb:

This brilliant series of theological reflections from internationally known scholar and Anglican cleric Samuel Wells reflects on the challenges of our understanding of Christ’s crucifixion that arise today using contemporary ideas in history, biblical studies, and philosophy. Wells deals with such questions as: “Does the improbability of one event having significance for everything, everywhere, for all time leave our faith hanging by a thread?” “Does the possibility that elements of the story did not actually happen leave our Christian heritage hanging by a thread?” “Does the history of persecution that flowed from the classical belief that the Jews were responsible for Jesus’ death leave our morality hanging by a thread?” After reflecting upon six biblical stories, Wells discovers that the cross has an enduring power to shape how we live, how we relate to one another, and how we allow ourselves to be enfolded in God’s story.

The format of our time together will be simple: each week we will review and discuss a couple chapters of the book. The chapters are short, 7-8 pages each, so the reading load will not be heavy.

Everyone is invited to the conversation.

To get a copy of the book or learn more about the series, contact Paul Marvin (pmarvin@nc.rr.com, 919.477.6974).