June 8 Piedmont Patch Free Talk: Notes from a Small Prairie with Annabel Renwick

June 8 Piedmont Patch Free Talk: Notes from a Small Prairie with Annabel Renwick

The next free talk in the series offered by Piedmont Patch at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, June 8, 2019 features Dr. Annabel Renwick, Curator of the Blomquist Garden of Native Plants at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Dr. Renwick’s talk will describe the design and growth of a demonstration Piedmont prairie initiated at that garden in 2014 in a presentation to be held at the Piedmont Patch demonstration site, Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 8410 Merin Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27516.

“It’s quite extraordinary to consider that three hundred years ago the terrain surrounding Durham, North Carolina would have been dominated by grassland supporting a myriad of wild flowers, grasses, and associated wildlife,” Dr. Renwick notes. She adds, “Much of this landscape has disappeared due to urbanization, farming, and forestry, and even though the population of North Carolina continues to rise, there are ways we can help create habitats for wildlife in urbanized areas.”

Dr. Renwick will describe the creation of a one-acre rendition of native grassland created with almost 100 species of wild flowers and grasses totaling 20,000 plants at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, noting the changes that have occurred over the four years since its construction. 

Dr. Renwick’s work directly relates to the mission of Piedmont Patch, which is to demonstrate how to collaboratively restore native landscapes, one patch of Piedmont at a time. Our demonstration Piedmont Patch is located on the campus of the Episcopal Church of the Advocate at the intersection of Merin Road and Homestead Road in Chapel Hill. Visitors to the site are always welcome.

Learn more about Piedmont Patch at our web site: piedmontpatch.org.

Holy Week and Easter at the Advocate

Come and walk the Way with us.

The Prequel: Saturday, April 6
9 AM – Noon   
Site Stewardship morning: Come help get our ground ready for the Pee Wee Homes residents and for Holy Week and Easter. Many hands make light work!

Palm Sunday, April 14
+ Procession with Palms and Holy Eucharist. Gather at the Advocate Pond at 10:00 AM for the blessing of the palms, and flowers or branches brought from home. Procession followed by Holy Eucharist in the Chapel.

Monday of Holy Week, April 15
+ Tenebrae at 7 PM. We move into Holy Week with this service of growing darkness, readings and song. Music led by a visiting schola from Raleigh.

Tuesday of Holy Week, April 16
+ Holy Eucharist at 5:30 PM

Wednesday of Holy Week, April 17
+ Holy Eucharist at 5:30 PM

Maundy Thursday, April 18
+ Dinner fellowship (food provided), Foot-washing and Table Eucharist. Bishop Sam Rodman will offer the homily. In the Fleming Lodge at Camp New Hope. 6:30 PM. (Camp New Hope is on NC86, 3 miles north of the I40 – NC86 interchange)

Good Friday, April 19
+ The Way of the Cross/ Via Dolorosa. In Spanish and English. Beginning at 12 noon. Acompáñenos en peregrinaje desde la Alcaldia de Carrboro hasta el Cementerio Viejo (Beginning at Carrboro Town Hall, winding through Carrboro, and ending at the Old Cemetery. Through downtown Carrboro. Meet at Carrboro Town Hall. (no dogs, please). Note: Due to weather condition we will walk the Way of the Cross in the Advocate Chapel this year.
IMG_3090
+ The Good Friday Liturgy, with hymns, prayers, and the Passion from the Gospel of John. 6 PM in the Advocate Chapel.

+ The Wake. 7 PM – 9 PM. Gather with other friends of Jesus for a simple supper and to reminisce about his life and the experiences you have shared with him. Come on the hour or on the half hour and stay for any, or all, of the Wake.

Holy Saturday, April 20
+The Holy Saturday Liturgy at 10AM in the Advocate Chapel. Gather in the Chapel for this brief liturgy of readings, reflection and prayers.

10:30 AM   Rehearsal and preparations for The Great Vigil.

IMG_4811Saturday Night, April 20
+ The Great Vigil of Easter with Renewal of Baptismal Vows. This is our first liturgy of Easter, when we celebrate the Resurrection of our Lord in the darkness of night. (As you are able, please bring a bell, horn or whistle to accompany the Paschal Shout). In the Advocate Chapel. Starting at 8 PM.

Easter Day, April 21
+ 9 AM
         Holy Eucharist in the Chapel.

+ 10 AM        Festival Brunch (As you are able, bring a festive dish to share. Kids bring a basket for an Easter Egg hunt).

+ 11 AM        Holy Eucharist with baptism by the Pond. Bring your own chairs or blanket to sit upon.

Weather updates will be posted as needed.

Contemplative Prayer Retreat August 2-4!

Contemplative Prayer Retreat

The Contemplative Prayer Groups of Church of the Advocate and Church of the Holy Family will be hosting their annual contemplative prayer retreat at Avila Retreat Center in Durham on August 2-4, 2019.  While the focus of the retreat is contemplative prayer, the retreat is truly for anyone who would like a few days of quiet reflection.

Registration is $195 per person, which covers two nights lodging in a private room as well as Friday supper through Sunday breakfast.

Registration is open now and closes June 1. 

For more information, please contact Paul Marvin at pmarvin@nc.rr.com or 919.451.2843.

Lent at the Advocate

I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God’s holy Word. from the Book of Common Prayer Ash Wednesday liturgy.

Sundays in Lent

For the Season of Lent, we will have more silence in worship and we invite you to consider taking off your shoes when you enter the Chapel, as a way to acknowledge that you have entered a sacred space and time. If you wish to kneel, we invite you to bring a pillow from home, or to kneel on the floor. The liturgy each Sunday will begin with a penitential rite.

For the weekly schedule on Sundays and Wednesdays, visit TheAdvocateChurch.org

Ash Wednesday, March 6.
12 Noon     Holy Eucharist with the Imposition of Ashes
6 PM          Holy Eucharist with the Imposition of Ashes and Hymns

The House Dinner throughout the Season of Lent will happen on Thursdays at 7.  As usual, please let Charles Rousseau <charlesrousseau10@gmail.com> know if you plan to be there. See more about these occasions for fellowship and community here.

Lenten Study on Wednesday Nights at 7 PM: A Season of the Spirit, Readings for the Days of Lent. Join with others engaging in this helpful book by Martin Smith. For more information, contact “Paul B. Marvin” <pmarvin64@gmail.com>.

The Teachable Moment in Lent. Sunday morning at 10:10. Exploring The Cross and the Lynching Tree. “The cross and the lynching tree are separated by nearly 2,000 years. One is the universal symbol of Christian faith; the other is the quintessential symbol of black oppression in America. Though both are symbols of death, one represents a message of hope and salvation, while the other signifies the negation of that message by white supremacy.” James Cone, a founder and leader of black liberation theology, introduces “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” with these provocative words.
Join the Teachable Moment for the Sundays in Lent as we explore and respond to Cone’s work: how does injustice in the world influence how we understand Jesus’ death on the cross, where do we find hope, and how is God calling us to be advocates for justice and reconciliation in the twenty-first century? See more here.

Stations of the Cross Around the Advocate Pond
This Lent, The Episcopal Church of the Advocate invites our neighbors and friends, known and unknown, to participate in the ancient practice of prayer and reflection called the Stations of the Cross, around the Advocate Pond. Traditionally, the fourteen stations mark different events on the path that Jesus walked through the city of Jerusalem on the day of his death, from the house of the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, where he was condemned to die, to the hill at Golgatha, where he was crucified. At each station, participants pause for a reading from scripture, a prayer, and a time of meditation.  See more here.

Saturday, April 6  Site Stewardship Day. We will plant and mulch around the Pee wee Homes, clear up the winter accumulations and make ready for Holy Week and Easter ahead. 9 AM – noon.

Other Notes for Lent
The Rite of the Reconciliation of the Penitent (Confession)
Lent is a good season to engage in the Rite of Reconciliation of a Penitent – otherwise known as “making confession”. This simple yet powerful rite is in the Book of Common Prayer (pp. 447-452) and is required of none, recommended for some, and beneficial for all. It helps us to examine our lives, relieve the burdens of our souls, and prepare the way for the joy of Easter. It is private; it is confidential. The Vicar and the Priest Associate are available to offer the Rite of Reconciliation, or to recommend other priests to you.

 

Stations of the Cross Around the Advocate Pond

IMG_9692This Lent, The Episcopal Church of the Advocate invites our neighbors and friends, known and unknown, to participate in the ancient practice of prayer and reflection called the Stations of the Cross, around the Advocate Pond. Traditionally, the fourteen stations mark different events on the path that Jesus walked through the city of Jerusalem on the day of his death, from the house of the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, where he was condemned to die, to the hill at Golgatha, where he was crucified. At each station, participants pause for a reading from scripture, a prayer, and a time of meditation.

From early times, each of the fourteen stations has been marked by a Roman numeral. At The Advocate, we have localized the stations by using discarded railroad spikes from the nearby tracks for the numerals, and affixing them to reclaimed local barn boards.

A booklet of the fourteen stations, with prayer and scripture readings, as well as an olive wood cross to carry as you go, are available in a box under the well house roof. There is also a booklet of a children’s version of the stations. The first station is just to the east of the altar (towards the railroad tracks), and the stations proceed counterclockwise around the pond, ending with the fourteenth station just to the west of the altar.

The Stations may be walked and prayed at any time by any one.  All are welcome.

Ash Wednesday Services March 6 at Noon and 6 PM

UnknownT.S. Eliot once wrote, “What we call the beginning is often the end and to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from.”

On Ash Wednesday, March 6, in services at noon and 6 PM, we will gather in the Advocate Chapel,  to remember our mortality — that we are dust, and to dust we shall return. We will also mark the beginning of our Lenten journey, the forty day season of our preparation for the holiest days of the Christian year – Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday. In so doing, we will anticipate – however paradoxically – the end of our Lenten journey even as it begins.

From that ending, we make our beginning, together as people of faith.

Come be a part of the journey.

The Cross and The Lynching Tree: Teachable Moment in Lent

Lenten Series: Exploring “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” by James H. Cone
Teachable Moment (10:00am), March 10, March 17, March 24, March 31 and April 7
“The cross and the lynching tree are separated by nearly 2,000 years. One is the universal symbol of Christian faith; the other is the quintessential symbol of black oppression in America. Though both are symbols of death, one represents a message of hope and salvation, while the other signifies the negation of that message by white supremacy.” James Cone, a founder and leader of black liberation theology, introduces “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” with these provocative words.
Join the Teachable Moment for the Sundays in Lent as we explore and respond to Cone’s work: how does injustice in the world influence how we understand Jesus’ death on the cross, where do we find hope, and how is God calling us to be advocates for justice and reconciliation in the twenty-first century?
Sunday, March 10
Teachable Moment:  The Rev. Dr. James Cone shares how “the cross helped me to deal with the brutal legacy of the lynching tree, and the lynching tree helped me to understand the tragic meaning of the cross.” For the first Sunday in this series, we’ll explore these images together and consider how following Jesus means taking a stand against white supremacy and every kind of injustice, and who’s still being crucified today. Read the book if you have time to, but come join the conversation regardless. You might also enjoy this video of Dr. Cone discussing the book or this interview with Bill Moyers.
Also Sunday, March 10
Join Advocates and community members for a special screening of the documentary “Strange Fruit,” followed by a panel discussion. Where: Varsity Theatre, 123 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. 4:00 – 5:30 pm; free. The event is sponsored by the Orange County Community Remembrance Coalition, which is partnering with the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, AL (the “lynching memorial”) to commemorate the 1898 lynching of Manly McCauley in Orange County. Read more about the project here; coalition leaders will be our guest presenters at the Teachable Moment on March 31.
All are encouraged to read the book, but the Teachable Moment time will be accessible both to those who have read it and those who haven’t.
NB: Many Advocates have attended the Racial Equity Institute’s anti-racism training and found it to informative, challenging and inspirational. We have funding for others want to go! Check out the upcoming workshop schedule here, and remember that alums may audit a repeat session for a very small fee (but you still have to register).

A Celebration of the Pee Wee Homes at the Advocate. 1/27 at 3 PM

You’re invited to the Celebration of the three Pee Wee Homes at The Advocate!
Date: Sunday, January 27, 2019 3pm-5 pm
Location: Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 8410 Merin Rd, Chapel Hill


Together we will celebrate the completion of three affordable tiny homes at the Church of the Advocate. These three new tiny homes are 320 square feet each, nestled among trees overlooking a pond on the Church of the Advocate property; one of the homes is ADA accessible. The church and Pee Wee Homes have partnered over the past three years on this innovative project to increase affordable housing opportunities for people who are experiencing homelessness.

 

Funding for the project comes from the Town of Chapel Hill, Strowd Roses, students of UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, the Church of the Advocate, and private donations. We are still raising the final funds for this project, and planning for future Pee Wee Homes projects. We welcome donations online and at the celebration.

 

The Pee Wee Homes model includes a community of support for each resident – that for the Church of the Advocate project will be provided by the members of the congregation, nearby neighbors, and PWH representatives.These long-term rentals, along with the first PWH development in Chapel Hill’s Northside neighborhood – a “tiny-plex” located at 601 Craig Street – will be managed by Pee Wee Homes.

 

Pee Wee Homes (PWH) was born out of the dire need to help fill the affordable housing gap – particularly for those with the lowest incomes. It is an all-volunteer nonprofit agency that includes the church Vicar and local affordable housing, homelessness, and social justice professionals. Learn more about Pee Wee Homes here!

A Contemplative Eucharist, Sundays at 5 PM

IMG_3456From Faulkner’s Light in August:

“Sunday evening prayer meeting.  It has seemed to him always that at that hour man approaches nearest of all to God, nearer than at any other hour of all the seven days. Then alone, of all church gatherings, is there something of that peace which is the promise and the end of the Church.  The mind and the heart purged then, if it is ever to be; the week and its whatever disasters finished and summed and expiated by the stern and formal fury of the morning service; the next week and its whatever disasters not yet born, the heart quiet now for a little while beneath the cool soft blowing of faith and hope.”

IMG_4235In the Seasons of Epiphany and Lent, the Advocate will host a Contemplative Eucharist on Sundays at 5 PM in the Chapel. The main characteristic of a Contemplative Eucharist is a lot of silence — silent space for being and listening, for contemplation and for receiving the Spirit. This service is pared down — only one reading, simple chants led by a cantor without instrument accompaniment, and a silent meditation on the Gospel reading. We sit in a circle for the liturgy of the Word and stand for the Offertory and Eucharistic prayer. Candles in the middle of our space provide focus. It is a peaceful way to conclude the weekend or to prepare for the week ahead.

Come join us.

 

 

 

House Dinner — Wednesday evenings (and occasional Thursdays) at 7 PM

In the weekly Wednesday House Dinners, The Advocate House becomes a place of shared food, shared stories, and deep fellowship. Our Advocate resident, Charles Rousseau is the host, providing an atmosphere of welcome, mutual care, and good humor. We call it House Dinner.

House Dinner is a time of togetherness over a shared meal, concluding with an invitation to respond to an open-ended prompt, often about an idea or concept (e.g., “shelter,” “grace,” “Christmas spirit”).

All are welcome any time, But it helps if you can let Charles know you are coming and if you can contribute food to the meal, so he can be sure the food and setting are gracious and welcoming.

Contact Charles Rousseau <charlesrousseau10@gmail.com>, ideally by Tuesday of the week to let him know.

The Hose Dinner takes place on Wednesday, night at 7 PM except for when other events are scheduled at the church on that night, such at the Readers Roundtable on second Wednesdays, or a seasonal book study, as in Lent. On those weeks, the House Dinner moves to Thursday night at 7 PM.

Check the weekly calendar on the Advocate website for clarity!