June 8 Piedmont Patch Free Talk: Notes from a Small Prairie with Annabel Renwick

June 8 Piedmont Patch Free Talk: Notes from a Small Prairie with Annabel Renwick

The next free talk in the series offered by Piedmont Patch at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, June 8, 2019 features Dr. Annabel Renwick, Curator of the Blomquist Garden of Native Plants at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Dr. Renwick’s talk will describe the design and growth of a demonstration Piedmont prairie initiated at that garden in 2014 in a presentation to be held at the Piedmont Patch demonstration site, Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 8410 Merin Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27516.

“It’s quite extraordinary to consider that three hundred years ago the terrain surrounding Durham, North Carolina would have been dominated by grassland supporting a myriad of wild flowers, grasses, and associated wildlife,” Dr. Renwick notes. She adds, “Much of this landscape has disappeared due to urbanization, farming, and forestry, and even though the population of North Carolina continues to rise, there are ways we can help create habitats for wildlife in urbanized areas.”

Dr. Renwick will describe the creation of a one-acre rendition of native grassland created with almost 100 species of wild flowers and grasses totaling 20,000 plants at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, noting the changes that have occurred over the four years since its construction. 

Dr. Renwick’s work directly relates to the mission of Piedmont Patch, which is to demonstrate how to collaboratively restore native landscapes, one patch of Piedmont at a time. Our demonstration Piedmont Patch is located on the campus of the Episcopal Church of the Advocate at the intersection of Merin Road and Homestead Road in Chapel Hill. Visitors to the site are always welcome.

Learn more about Piedmont Patch at our web site: piedmontpatch.org.

The Cross and The Lynching Tree: Teachable Moment in Lent

Lenten Series: Exploring “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” by James H. Cone
Teachable Moment (10:00am), March 10, March 17, March 24, March 31 and April 7
“The cross and the lynching tree are separated by nearly 2,000 years. One is the universal symbol of Christian faith; the other is the quintessential symbol of black oppression in America. Though both are symbols of death, one represents a message of hope and salvation, while the other signifies the negation of that message by white supremacy.” James Cone, a founder and leader of black liberation theology, introduces “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” with these provocative words.
Join the Teachable Moment for the Sundays in Lent as we explore and respond to Cone’s work: how does injustice in the world influence how we understand Jesus’ death on the cross, where do we find hope, and how is God calling us to be advocates for justice and reconciliation in the twenty-first century?
Sunday, March 10
Teachable Moment:  The Rev. Dr. James Cone shares how “the cross helped me to deal with the brutal legacy of the lynching tree, and the lynching tree helped me to understand the tragic meaning of the cross.” For the first Sunday in this series, we’ll explore these images together and consider how following Jesus means taking a stand against white supremacy and every kind of injustice, and who’s still being crucified today. Read the book if you have time to, but come join the conversation regardless. You might also enjoy this video of Dr. Cone discussing the book or this interview with Bill Moyers.
Also Sunday, March 10
Join Advocates and community members for a special screening of the documentary “Strange Fruit,” followed by a panel discussion. Where: Varsity Theatre, 123 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. 4:00 – 5:30 pm; free. The event is sponsored by the Orange County Community Remembrance Coalition, which is partnering with the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, AL (the “lynching memorial”) to commemorate the 1898 lynching of Manly McCauley in Orange County. Read more about the project here; coalition leaders will be our guest presenters at the Teachable Moment on March 31.
All are encouraged to read the book, but the Teachable Moment time will be accessible both to those who have read it and those who haven’t.
NB: Many Advocates have attended the Racial Equity Institute’s anti-racism training and found it to informative, challenging and inspirational. We have funding for others want to go! Check out the upcoming workshop schedule here, and remember that alums may audit a repeat session for a very small fee (but you still have to register).

A Celebration of the Pee Wee Homes at the Advocate. 1/27 at 3 PM

You’re invited to the Celebration of the three Pee Wee Homes at The Advocate!
Date: Sunday, January 27, 2019 3pm-5 pm
Location: Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 8410 Merin Rd, Chapel Hill


Together we will celebrate the completion of three affordable tiny homes at the Church of the Advocate. These three new tiny homes are 320 square feet each, nestled among trees overlooking a pond on the Church of the Advocate property; one of the homes is ADA accessible. The church and Pee Wee Homes have partnered over the past three years on this innovative project to increase affordable housing opportunities for people who are experiencing homelessness.

 

Funding for the project comes from the Town of Chapel Hill, Strowd Roses, students of UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, the Church of the Advocate, and private donations. We are still raising the final funds for this project, and planning for future Pee Wee Homes projects. We welcome donations online and at the celebration.

 

The Pee Wee Homes model includes a community of support for each resident – that for the Church of the Advocate project will be provided by the members of the congregation, nearby neighbors, and PWH representatives.These long-term rentals, along with the first PWH development in Chapel Hill’s Northside neighborhood – a “tiny-plex” located at 601 Craig Street – will be managed by Pee Wee Homes.

 

Pee Wee Homes (PWH) was born out of the dire need to help fill the affordable housing gap – particularly for those with the lowest incomes. It is an all-volunteer nonprofit agency that includes the church Vicar and local affordable housing, homelessness, and social justice professionals. Learn more about Pee Wee Homes here!

Epiphany Commissions

IMG_1962_2Realizing that Christians are called to ministry in the world, each Sunday in the Season of Epiphany, The Church of the Advocate commissions  people to their life, work and vocation in the community and world around us. 

We will be commissioning the following vocations on the following dates:

Epiphany I, January 13:  All  who are in a Period of Discernment or Expectancy

Epiphany II, January 20:     All who are caregivers for others.

Epiphany III, January 27: The Advocate Annual Meeting.  All who serve the public good.    

Epiphany IV,  February 3: All who are in transition or are retired.

Epiphany V, February 10: All those engaged in expressive and creative endeavors.      

Epiphany VI, February 17: All who work in the pursuit of knowledge.

Epiphany VII, February 24: All who engage in farming, gardening and stewardship of creation.

Last Epiphany, March 3: The Transfiguration: All who are the People of the Advocate

Come join us!

 

Posted here are some sample commissions from throughout the years.

SAMPLE COMMISSIONS 

All Who Work in the Pursuit of Knowledge

Celebrant: Now there are a variety of gifts but the same Spirit

People: There are a variety of services but the same Lord

Celebrant: We call forward all who work to increase our knowledge and understanding of God’s vast creation

Those to be commissioned come forward and present themselves to the celebrant and congregation

Celebrant: Lord, we present to you these teachers, students, scholars and administrators; researchers, inventors, scientists, and information specialists; historians, philosophers, theologians, and all who seek a deeper understanding of truth

Commissioned: Here I am, Lord

Celebrant: Do you celebrate your God given gifts?

Commissioned: We do

Celebrant: Do you seek the blessing of God and God’s Church?

Commissioned: We do

Celebrant: Do you promise, with the help of God, to use your gifts to serve God and neighbor?

Commissioned: We do

Celebrant: Almighty God, the fountain of all wisdom: enlighten by your Holy Spirit those who teach and those who learn

Commissioned: We rejoice in the knowledge of your truth

Celebrant: Bless their pursuit of sound learning, new discovery, and the pursuit of wisdom

Commissioned: May we find in you the source of all truth

Celebrant: Give them times of refreshment and peace

Commissioned: That we may renew our minds, rebuild our bodies, and open our spirits to serve you from generation to generation

Celebrant: This we ask through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.

Commissioned: Amen

Celebrant: This we ask through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.

Commissioned: Amen

—————————–

For all those who care for the well being of others: for doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, therapists and all who study to do so

Call: Mighty and merciful God, who sent Jesus to heal broken lives, we praise you for raising up men and women who are skilled in the healing arts

Response: Strengthen their bodies that they may bend to care for young and old, and let them carry your gift of wholeness to all who suffer in body or mind

Call: Give them eyes to see and ears to hear

Response: Keep them ever open to a tear or cry of distress

Call:  Lighten their hearts even when they are heavy or hurting

Response: Let them be touched as they offer your healing touch and presence. May they make the weak strong, the sick healthy, and the broken whole

Call: Bless them as agents of your love

ResponseIn your name we pray

AllAmen

+++

 

 

Advocate Tithe Applications Due November 25

The Episcopal Church of the Advocate is committed to giving a minimum of 10% of our pledged income and plate offering received each Sunday to individuals and organizations in the community. In other words, for every $10 pledged, $1 will be given to those in need and those working for peace and justice in the world. This offering is called the Advocate Tithe for Community Engagement. Distribution of the Advocate Tithe is determined at the recommendation of the Community Engagement Facilitators.

Procedures for Requesting Support

  • Here is the Application for Support from the Advocate Tithe: tithe proposal form
  • Completed forms may be sent to the church at: The Advocate Church Office <theadvocatechurch@gmail.com>
  • Applications are due by Sunday, November 25.
  • Proposals will be evaluated by how closely they match the Advocate’s Core Values (Compassion, Justice, and Transformation) as well as the priorities for giving and involvement identified  by the congregation. Priority is given to those programs an projects in which people of the Advocate are directly involved.

Decisions about supporting proposals are made by consensus among those present at meetings of the Community Engagement Facilitators. All proposals for financial or other support will be reviewed and approved on the basis of their fulfillment of our core values.

In our decisions about how to engage with the community around us, we prefer to:

  • Support projects that give voice to people who are marginalized and have very little voice.
  • Provide not only financial support, but also the time and talent of members of the congregation.
  • Support projects in which members of the congregation are already involved.
  • Support projects and organizations that are accountable, sustainable, and willing to teach us about their outcomes.
  • Support projects and organizations that are willing to send representatives to visit and help educate the congregation about their issues of concern.
  • Support groups that promote change, as well as those that meet direct needs.
  • 10% of our Tithe grants are given in the spirit of the Millennium Development Goals, usually supporting a ministry overseas.

The Advocate Tithe for 2017 was distributed as follows:

Vicar’s Discretionary Fund                $2500
Inter Faith Council                            $2000
Justice United                                   $1500
Club Nova                                         $1000
Community of the Franciscan Way    $1000
EmPOWerment Inc                            $1000
Autism Society of North Carolina      $1000
Compass Center                                 $1000
Johnson Service Corps                       $1250
Jackson Center                                   $750
Episcopal Farmworker Ministry         $1500
Community Empowerment Fund       $1000
Farmer Foodshare                             $500
Church of the Rec Sanctuary             $500
Ahli Hospital, Gaza City Palestine      $1250
Teachers salaries at St. Innocents Tickolette Haiti $500

To view distributions in previous years, visit here.

 

Chapel Hill Merchants and Students Support Pee Wee Homes

UNC student Justin Pacher has produced this short video to help raise awareness of the Pee Wee Homes.  It’s part of an assignment from Jim Kitchen, Entrepreneur-in-residence at the Kenan-Flagler Business School. Student are practicing the social entrepreneurship skills they’ve been learning in class and will donate funds raised to the Pee Wee Homes.

Justin arranged for  local merchants to offer discounts to anyone with a Pee Wee Homes coupon card. Cards are available for a $5 donation at The Advocate next Sunday!

Meet Our Beekeeper Saturday at 10 AM

Meet Our Beekeeper

June 23 @ 10:00 am11:00 am

Free

In honor of National Pollinator Week (June 18-24, 2018), the Piedmont Patch Beekeeper, Gillian Hadden, will be on site to introduce folks to the honeybees living in the hive beside the pond where volunteers have planted over 1000 native grasses and wildflowers. She’ll demonstrate her equipment, show us how the bees are doing (Spoiler alert – They are making honey!), and talk a bit about what honeybees and native pollinators need to thrive. Gillian tells us that she became interested in beekeeping after learning about the difficulties these (and native) pollinators are facing. All ages are welcome.

Reconstructing The Gospel: A Poor Peoples Campaign Conversation

The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call For Moral Revival begins 40 Days of Nonviolent Direct Action to stir the conscience of our country.

During these six weeks, The Advocate will offer a reading group for those interested in sustaining our analysis of whiteness and deepening our understanding of Christianity’s role in the history of American racism.

We will read local theologian Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove’s new book, Reconstructing The Gospel: Finding Freedom From Slaveholder Religion.

Two copies are available on loan from the Advocate library.
We will discuss the book on Wednesday nights from 7:15-8:15 (except June 13, which is. Reader’s Roundtable night). More info to come!