Advocate to host “We Cried Power” Film Watch and Panel

We invite you to join us on Zoom SundayJune 14, from 7:00-8:30 PM for a screening of We Cried Power — the powerful new documentary film about the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival (PPC). PPC is an initiative started by The Rev. Dr. William Barber, former head of the NCNAACP, to carry on the fusion anti-poverty work begun by Dr. Martin Luther King shortly before his assassination.

The 45-minute film will be followed by a panel discussion facilitated by the Rev. Lisa Fischbeck, Church of the Advocate, with Chapel Hill-Carrboro NAACP President Anna Richards, Diane Robertson, Chapel Hill-Carrboro NAACP Political Action Chair, and Jennifer Bremer, NC League of Women Voters State Board Member. 

If you are interested in joining us, please contact Elizabeth@elizabethadams.com 

Click here to watch the trailer: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/wecriedpower

see also: https://www.wecriedpower.com/

Program sponsors:
The Episcopal Church of the Advocate, Lead Sponsor
Chapel Hill – Carrboro NAACP, Political Action Committee, Co-Sponsor
WILPF Triangle (Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom), Co-Sponsor
League of Women Voters, Orange, Durham, and Chatham Counties, Co-Sponsor

Even if you aren’t able to join us Sunday, we hope you will register for the Digital event – National Poor People’s Moral March on Washington on June 20, 2020. Please click this link to RSVP for June 20, 2020, a Digital Gathering. To volunteer with the PPC, email volunteers@poorpeoplescampaign.org

Pentecost 2020 Sermon by the Vicar, Lisa Fischbeck

Here’s the video link. (13 minutes)

Here’s the text.

Pentecost 2020
The Advocate on Zoom
May 31, 2020

In the Name of the creating, restring and transforming God,
Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Fire

It brings comfort to a cold night.
It lends an air of celebration and joy on days of festivity.
It can serve as a conduit for good reading, a nap, a bit of romance perhaps.
Come heavenly comforter,
Spirit of Peace.

But it isn’t wintertime here in North Carolina this Pentecost Sunday.
And the fire of the Spirit is not all sweet comfort.

Instead, we are perched on a Sunday after a week of civil unrest across our nation.
A week in our nation when as much as ever we need a voice 
of compassion, equanimity, calm and strength 
emanating from our nation’s leadership.
And what we are getting instead is …
Well, what we are getting instead is something else.
So we turn to our God.

Fire

It refines and purifies,
It cleanses us of impurity.
And I’m not speaking here of what might be considered physical impurities,
Rather the impurities of mind, heart and soul,
Impurities such as racism,
That get in the way of our knowing and making known
God justice, God’s mercy, God’s Peace and God’s Love.

Fire.

I am grateful to Nancy Trueblood for organizing our poly-lingual reading of the story of Pentecost from the book of Acts.

So that we can experience anew the chaos and the celebration of many languages, many people,

And with the translation before us on the PowerPoint provided by Nathan,

we, too, can understand what is being said in languages that are not our own.

We need to remember that the Christian Pentecost story 

started with the disciples all holed up in fear and uncertainty.

They’d already been through the crucifixion 

and all the fear and uncertainty that had caused.

They’d already been through the experience of resurrection and all the sweet relief and excitement it brought on,

They’d already been with Jesus among them for a season,

Setting their hearts at ease,

Challenging them anew,

Causing them to realize that things were not ever going to be the same.

That there was a “new normal” indeed.

But then Jesus disappeared again.

Ascended.

They saw him go.

Sure, he offered comforting words before he left.

But still,

Here they were again,

Holed up in one place together,

Filled with fear and uncertainty.

Not knowing what the future would bring.

What the nextnew normal would be.
Sound familiar?

When suddenly, 
there was the sound of a rushing and violent wind,

Think hurricane or tornado.

There was the sound of a rushing and violent wind.

And then the appearance of tongues,

“As of fire”, the story goes.

And those tongues as of fire landed on each of them.

None other than the Holy Spirit was filling them, 

and filling the room.

The next thing they knew,

They were able to speak and understand in languages they did not know before.

And they were united,

Not only with each other,

But with all the crowds gathered on the streets outside their window.

Because everyone could understand everyone.

It was as if there were a universal language.

No.

It was that there wasa universal language.

The language of the Holy Spirit.

Fire. 

You may have heard in recent days

A recording of a speech delivered by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

In 1967.

It was a speech he gave against the backdrop of rioting that rocked our cities that summer.

He called it “the other America.”

One America, King said,  
is overflowing with the milk of prosperity and the honey of opportunity. 
This America is the habitat of millions of people who have food and material necessities for their bodies; 
and culture and education for their minds; 
and freedom and human dignity for their spirits. 

This sounds like most of the people most of us know, doesn’t it….

But tragically and unfortunately,King went on… 
there is another America. 
This other America has a daily ugliness about it that constantly transforms the ebulliency of hope into the fatigue of despair. …
In this America people are poor by the millions. …

In the speech, King goes on to underscore his commitment to non-violence.

And he also works to help those who would listen

To understand why the rioting was happening.

A riot is the language of the unheard.He said.
A riot is the language of the unheard.

And what is it that America has failed to hear? Among other things, Kings said:
…it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality, and humanity.

And so, King went on, 

in a real sense our nation’s summers of riots 
are caused by our nation’s winters of delay. 
And as long as America postpones justice, 

we stand in the position of having these recurrences of violence and riots over and over again. 

A riot is the language of the unheard.

A riot is the language of anger, yes,

Anger over constant, persistent unending injustice and oppression.

It is the language of a people who can find no other way to be seen and be heard.
And here on this day of Pentecost, 2020,

We cannot miss the significance of the fire,

As buildings burn, as cars burn, as fires burn in the souls of the downtrodden.

The fire of Pentecost lit on the disciples

And empowered them,

Not only to speak and understand languages they did not previously know,

But also to share the message of God

To all the then known world.

That’s power. 

Changing a group of frightened people,

Uncertain of what the future would bring,

Into go-getters of the highest form.

Fire

It is in the spirit of unity and in celebration of the fire of Pentecost

That you and I are wearing red this morning.

You, and I and Jesus. (point)

By wearing red, 

We are,

At least at some level,

taking the fire of Pentecost ontoourselves and  intoourselves this day.

Like a mantle.

Do you feel it?

What does mean to carry the mantle of Pentecost?

What does it mean really, to wear red on this day?
Certainly it is fun and unifying and joyful,

And that is good.

Certainly it reminds us of the comfort and Peace that the Holy Spirit brings.

That’s good, too.

But we all know that thisPentecost,

This Pentecost 2020

Is a Pentecost amidst a covid crisis that has laid bare the economic disparities of our land.

It is a Pentecost amid another round of riots rising out of the atrocity of our nation’s long history of racism.

Will we let our common language include the language of the unheard?

Will we seize this Pentecost moment in our nation and in our lives?

I know, I know it is hard to know what to do.

What can we do?

Especially in these covid times.

What can we do?

Well, I want to make three suggestions.

Three things we can do, and all they will take

For now

is our time.

No more than 4 hours and 9 minutes of our time.

First, if you haven’t seen it already,

do a search and find a video link to the 9-minute video of the arrest and murder of George Floyd.

Watch it. Watch all 9 minutes of it.

And realize that the abuse of black human beings,

Especially black men, 

That we associate with mid-19thcentury America, 

is still very much a part of our nation’s way.

Second,

Tune into MSNBC tonight at 9 PM

 And watch Poverty and the Pandemic.

A discussion with Joy Reid and William Barber.

Come to understand more fully the language of the unheard.
Black, brown and white.

Third,

Participate in The Mass Poor People’s Assembly and Moral March 

on Saturday, June 20.

It’ll happen at 10 am or 6 PM, or on Saturday, June 20.

Stay tuned in for all, or if need be just some of the two hours.

It may get tedious.

It may feel repetitive.

Stay with it.

However inconvenient it may be to us,

  1. It is asking a whole lot less time that getting on a bus and going to Washington DC for the day, which is what we were planning before covid 19 hit.
  2. Whatever inconvenience it entails is not nearly as inconvenient as the inconvenience experienced by the poor and the oppressed in our society every single day.

On Sunday, June 21, we will talk about it in our screenside chat.

This may not feel like enough, and it isn’t.

But I offer these three things we can do 

Because we can do them,

to share in the language of the unheard.

Maybe we can consider it our Pentecost pledge.

As we prayed earlier in our in this liturgy:
Officiant:     If Christ’s disciples keep silent

All:             These stones would shout aloud.   

We cannot keep silent.

Fire. 

See the fires of this day, 

Feel the burn, (that’s burn, with a u)

Feeling it in our red clothing, in our zoom, in our national news,

See the fire, feel the fire, share the fire.

until allGod’s children can come to know

The language of the unheard 

and they are unheard no more.

Until allGod’s children can come to know

the language of God’s justice, God’s mercy,
God’s Peace and God’s love.                                                                                                         

Amen.

Advocates Helping Our Neighbors in Need

As we seek to find our way in these strange times, that way is off balanced if we don’t also respond to our neighbors in need. Many of you are already finding ways to do this. Here are some ways you can help via The Advocate.
Because we aren’t taking up our weekly food offerings on Sundays, we will be contributing to the food pantry at the Interfaith Council via bell tower drop-offs.


The Advocate Garden yielded 2 1/2 gallon bags  of sugar snap peas , one bag of chard, and 6 or so bags of lettuce, delivered to the IFC

As you are out shopping pick up any of the following to donate. You can leave food donations in the Advocate Chapel bell tower.

  1. Canned meat (spam, tuna, salmon, vienna sausages)
  2. Pork and beans
  3. Baked beans
  4. Pinto beans
  5. Chili
  6. Ramen
  7. Pasta
  8. Peanut butter
  9. Jelly
  10. Snacks
  11. Cereal
  12. Spaghetti
  13. Toilet paper
  14. Shampoo
  15. Liquid soap
  16. Coffee/tea/hot chocolate
  17. Juice
  18. Fresh or frozen chicken or turkey for take-out meals
  19. Olive oil and butter for take-out meal preparation

In the weeks ahead, we will once again collect food to assist the good people of the Rogers/Eubanks Neighborhood Association in collecting food for those in need in the neighborhood. They will supplement food donations with food purchased at discount in order to provide three meals to 250 different households. 

Let’s Walk the CROP Walk together March 29!

Help combat hunger in our own communities and throughout the world by participating in the annual CROP Hunger Walk on Sunday, March 29.  The Chapel Hill-Carrboro Hunger Walk steps off at 2:30 p.m.  at the Carrboro Town Commons.

Register and Raise funds in Person 
You can register in person by completing a Sign-in Sheet and Donation Envelope, available in the Advocate Bell Tower or from Team Co-captains Nancy Trueblood or Sallie Moore. 

Register and Raise Funds Online
Visit https://www.crophungerwalk.org/chapelhillnc/Click on Join Our Team (Advocate Episcopal Church) create your own account and learn how to share your online profile through a custom url, email, or on social media so that friends and family can donate to the walk through you.

Purchase a T-shirt
For $6 you can purchase a T-shirt to show your solidarity with our walkers.  See Nancy or Sallie, or email trueblood.nancy@gmail.comor sallie305@gmail.comso we can set aside one for you – even if you’re not able to walk, you can wear the shirt to show your solidarity with our team.

THANK YOU!  

ChurchLands

In 2018, the Episcopal Church’s General Convention passed Resolution D053: Stewardship of Creation with Church-Owned Lands, which affirmed that church-owned land holds the potential for ecological benefit, community healing, and ministries of discipleship and evangelism. The newly formed ChurchLands initiative seeks to inspire and equip church leaders who are tasked with the care of church-owned land. 

With our 15 acres of land, and a commitment to be good stewards of that land, The Advocate seems like a good prospective participant in the program!

The vision of ChurchLands is to inspire and assist churches in stewarding land in a way that is faithful to the Gospel: integrating discipleship, ecology, justice, and health. In its pilot stage, ChurchLands will develop a small group of Christian leaders learning and working together on land use issues in their local contexts.

This cohort has been selected, but we can still be involved!

In the seasons ahead, ChurchLands will offer regular in-person gatherings to explore Scripture, practical theology, and land use issues for Christians who care for land. An online ChurchLands Network will serve as a national platform to inspire and engage this work through network building and resource-sharing. The ChurchLands initiative will be managed through Plainsong Farm & Ministry in Rockford, Michigan, a ministry in the Episcopal Diocese of Western Michigan. 

Folks can participate by connecting with current cohort members, participating in webinars, or as prayer partners. For more information, contact Emma Lietz Bilecky emmalietz@gmail.com.

Sankofa: African-American History on Wheels MLK weekend

Sunday, January 19 and Monday, January 20
Noon – 5:30 PM.
At the Rogers Road Community Center

101 Edgar Street, Chapel Hill.

This MLK weekend, The Church of the Advocate joins the Rogers-Eubanks Neighborhood Association, Community Center, the Marion Cheek Jackson Center, the Town of Carrboro, the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, and the Chapel Hill-Carrboro NCAAP Branch 5689, in bringing the Sankofa African-American History on Wheels to our region.

From the flyer:
Angela Jennings established SANKOFA in 1995 to teach young African Americans about their unique and rich heritage. It has emerged as an informative and engaging mobil museum of African American history for all ages and races.

Spanning the period of 1860 to the present, Sankofa takes audiences on a journey through slavery, the era of King Cotton, and the uplifting days of Emancipation. It also tells the stories of such notables as Ida B. Wells, the Negro Baseball League, the Tuskegee Airmen, and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Ghanian term, Sankofa, tells us to “use the wisdom of the past to build the future.” This exhibit epitomizes the meaning of the term by educating, enlightening, and empower gin young and old alike with living history.

Plan to join others at the Roger Road Community Center this MLK weekend!

Jobs posted at Farmer Foodshare and the IFC!

Farmer Foodshare is looking for an Executive Director. “Farmer Foodshare approaches hunger from both sides of the problem – small farmers struggling to stay in business, and disadvantaged populations who lack access to fresh and nutritious food. This is what makes them unique! Since 2009, Farmer Foodshare has fostered cross-sector partnerships to build a local food system in which all members of our community can have access to healthy, nutritious food, and those who labor in agriculture can make a viable living.”

See more about the Farmer Foodshare Executive Director job posting here!

Also, the InterFaith Council is seeking a Heavenly Groceries Food Ministry Coordinator. A terrific opportunity for someone who wants to work 15 hours a week for a very good agency. See flyer below.

June 8 Piedmont Patch Free Talk: Notes from a Small Prairie with Annabel Renwick

June 8 Piedmont Patch Free Talk: Notes from a Small Prairie with Annabel Renwick

The next free talk in the series offered by Piedmont Patch at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, June 8, 2019 features Dr. Annabel Renwick, Curator of the Blomquist Garden of Native Plants at Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Dr. Renwick’s talk will describe the design and growth of a demonstration Piedmont prairie initiated at that garden in 2014 in a presentation to be held at the Piedmont Patch demonstration site, Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 8410 Merin Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27516.

“It’s quite extraordinary to consider that three hundred years ago the terrain surrounding Durham, North Carolina would have been dominated by grassland supporting a myriad of wild flowers, grasses, and associated wildlife,” Dr. Renwick notes. She adds, “Much of this landscape has disappeared due to urbanization, farming, and forestry, and even though the population of North Carolina continues to rise, there are ways we can help create habitats for wildlife in urbanized areas.”

Dr. Renwick will describe the creation of a one-acre rendition of native grassland created with almost 100 species of wild flowers and grasses totaling 20,000 plants at Sarah P. Duke Gardens, noting the changes that have occurred over the four years since its construction. 

Dr. Renwick’s work directly relates to the mission of Piedmont Patch, which is to demonstrate how to collaboratively restore native landscapes, one patch of Piedmont at a time. Our demonstration Piedmont Patch is located on the campus of the Episcopal Church of the Advocate at the intersection of Merin Road and Homestead Road in Chapel Hill. Visitors to the site are always welcome.

Learn more about Piedmont Patch at our web site: piedmontpatch.org.

The Cross and The Lynching Tree: Teachable Moment in Lent

Lenten Series: Exploring “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” by James H. Cone
Teachable Moment (10:00am), March 10, March 17, March 24, March 31 and April 7
“The cross and the lynching tree are separated by nearly 2,000 years. One is the universal symbol of Christian faith; the other is the quintessential symbol of black oppression in America. Though both are symbols of death, one represents a message of hope and salvation, while the other signifies the negation of that message by white supremacy.” James Cone, a founder and leader of black liberation theology, introduces “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” with these provocative words.
Join the Teachable Moment for the Sundays in Lent as we explore and respond to Cone’s work: how does injustice in the world influence how we understand Jesus’ death on the cross, where do we find hope, and how is God calling us to be advocates for justice and reconciliation in the twenty-first century?
Sunday, March 10
Teachable Moment:  The Rev. Dr. James Cone shares how “the cross helped me to deal with the brutal legacy of the lynching tree, and the lynching tree helped me to understand the tragic meaning of the cross.” For the first Sunday in this series, we’ll explore these images together and consider how following Jesus means taking a stand against white supremacy and every kind of injustice, and who’s still being crucified today. Read the book if you have time to, but come join the conversation regardless. You might also enjoy this video of Dr. Cone discussing the book or this interview with Bill Moyers.
Also Sunday, March 10
Join Advocates and community members for a special screening of the documentary “Strange Fruit,” followed by a panel discussion. Where: Varsity Theatre, 123 E. Franklin Street, Chapel Hill. 4:00 – 5:30 pm; free. The event is sponsored by the Orange County Community Remembrance Coalition, which is partnering with the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, AL (the “lynching memorial”) to commemorate the 1898 lynching of Manly McCauley in Orange County. Read more about the project here; coalition leaders will be our guest presenters at the Teachable Moment on March 31.
All are encouraged to read the book, but the Teachable Moment time will be accessible both to those who have read it and those who haven’t.
NB: Many Advocates have attended the Racial Equity Institute’s anti-racism training and found it to informative, challenging and inspirational. We have funding for others want to go! Check out the upcoming workshop schedule here, and remember that alums may audit a repeat session for a very small fee (but you still have to register).

A Celebration of the Pee Wee Homes at the Advocate. 1/27 at 3 PM

You’re invited to the Celebration of the three Pee Wee Homes at The Advocate!
Date: Sunday, January 27, 2019 3pm-5 pm
Location: Episcopal Church of the Advocate, 8410 Merin Rd, Chapel Hill


Together we will celebrate the completion of three affordable tiny homes at the Church of the Advocate. These three new tiny homes are 320 square feet each, nestled among trees overlooking a pond on the Church of the Advocate property; one of the homes is ADA accessible. The church and Pee Wee Homes have partnered over the past three years on this innovative project to increase affordable housing opportunities for people who are experiencing homelessness.

 

Funding for the project comes from the Town of Chapel Hill, Strowd Roses, students of UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, the Church of the Advocate, and private donations. We are still raising the final funds for this project, and planning for future Pee Wee Homes projects. We welcome donations online and at the celebration.

 

The Pee Wee Homes model includes a community of support for each resident – that for the Church of the Advocate project will be provided by the members of the congregation, nearby neighbors, and PWH representatives.These long-term rentals, along with the first PWH development in Chapel Hill’s Northside neighborhood – a “tiny-plex” located at 601 Craig Street – will be managed by Pee Wee Homes.

 

Pee Wee Homes (PWH) was born out of the dire need to help fill the affordable housing gap – particularly for those with the lowest incomes. It is an all-volunteer nonprofit agency that includes the church Vicar and local affordable housing, homelessness, and social justice professionals. Learn more about Pee Wee Homes here!