Notes for the Season Ahead! (an evolving post)

Sunday, September 9, we will host a “Mission Fare” from 10 – 10:50 AM, ahead of the 11 AM liturgy. Come a discover ways to engage with God, the community around us, and the Church of the Advocate in the seasons ahead!
The 9 AM liturgy will be added on Sunday, September 16.
See the regular Sunday schedule here.
Here are some other Dates to Note (this is an evolving calendar, please check back for updates!).
Saturday, September 22, 10 AM – noon. The Piedmont Patch at the Advocate, in collaboration with the New Hope Audubon Chapter presents: Native Piedmont Birds. See more here.
Saturday, October 13, 9 AM – noon. An Advocate Site Stewardship autumn work day. Did somebody say “Mulch!”?
October 20-21, A Celebration of The Advocate’s 15th Anniversary, with music, food, festival liturgy, Piedmont Patch and Pee Wee Homes events. Our Bishop, Sam Rodman will join us Sunday morning.
Sunday October 21 at 1PM: Ribbon cutting for the Pee Wee Homes!
Other Good Things Ahead
Construction of the three Pee Wee Homes at the Advocate has (finally) begun. Volunteer Days will begin one the framing is up. To sign up to volunteer, see here.
A Study of the Hebrew Scriptures will begin September 16. See more here.

The Liturgy and Community — Teachable Moments September 16 – October 14. Details coming soon.

The Episcopal Church and The Advocate: Questions and Conversations.  7-8:30 PM, Wednesdays September 19 and 26, and October 3 and 17.

Readers Roundtable — Second Wednesdays — September 12, October 10, November 14, December 12. See more here.

Third Sunday Shape Note Sing  — August 19, September 16, October 21 — 2PM – 4 PM. In the Advocate Chapel. See more here.
check TheAdvocateChurch.org for updates and additions)

$39,300 and we’ll be debt free! $9,300 to go for the $20k match!

The story of Advocate Loans and Debt
In 2013, The Advocate was at the peak of our campaign to worship on the land. We had raised the funds to buy the land and to move what would become The Advocate Chapel, and we still needed to restore the chapel and to get the site up to code for use by a church (parking lot, sewer, pond repair, etc. etc.). We had raised a lot of money (over $1.7 million), but not enough. So we took out two loans:

  • A $180,000 loan from an anonymous individual loaner. This is the loan that we paid off in January 2018, after a lot of hard work and generosity from Advocates and friends, including a final $20,000 from the loaner!
  • A $150,000 loan from the North Carolina Episcopal Church Foundation. This loan was taken out in 2013,  to be paid at 2% interest over 10 years, ending in 2023.
    For 5 years, the $15,000 a year and the 2% interest were budgeted in the Advocate’s Annual Budget. Since January, 2018, though, we have begun to accelerate the payments, knowing that the sooner we pay off this loan, the sooner we can use that $15,000 a year to augment our life and ministry instead.

    When we had $50,000 left to go, a generous friend offered to match any gift given, up to $20,000, in time for the Advocate’s 15th Anniversary celebration, September 21, 2018. This would result in $40,000 bringing us closer to paying off our entire debt!

This is, quite frankly, stunning.
As of August 5, we have raised $10,700 toward that $20,000. We have $9,300 more to raise by September 21!

If you think you can help, checks should be designated for “Debt Relief” and written to The Episcopal Church of the Advocate (or ECOTA) and sent to 8410 Merin Road, Chapel Hill, NC, 27516.

Or, you can securely give online by going here.

Thank you!

 

“For Tom Fisher, On the Day of his Funeral” The sermon by Sam Laurent

The community gathered in the Advocate Chapel on Sunday, July 15, 2018,for the Burial Office for Tom Fisher.
Sam Laurent offered this sermon for Tom.

It’s there in the pictures. Looking at the photographs he took, the ones he exhibited, the ones he hung on his walls or that others of us have hung on our walls, you can see a bit of how Tom tried to see the world. It was a vision that didn’t come by accident. He cultivated it. Studied it. It ran deep in who he was, why we grieve him, and how we will know his presence again.

Street photography would be the name for the genre, and like many who were inspired by the french photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, Tom’s most creative work spurned grandeur and poses in favor of finding something beautiful in the mundane. A picture of someone doing their job. A picture of two people meeting on the street. Almost always, there were people.

So I asked him. Why these candid shots of people? In that way we had of giving his sophisticated wisdom a veneer of folksiness, Tom said “well, they’re a hell of a lot more interesting to take pictures of than rocks.”

And then he stared into the middle distance, lined up an imaginary shot in his mind and said “so there are two people coming together on the street. My job is to have my camera set up so that with minimal fussing with it, I can capture that moment. Just the encounter of two people is so fascinating. Maybe they know each other. Maybe they’re strangers. There is so much between them that I don’t know. I just want to capture the moment.”

The art in his images, then, was his reflexive attraction to wonder. Capture the moment, and you can return to it. You can imagine what was going on with the people in the picture and the space between them. But they remain mysteries. The photograph holds you in your unknowing, inviting you into a space of wonder.

And, well, so did Tom. As a financial planner, he made it his business to help people handle the uncertainty of life. His work helped people be able to turn their eyes from the nagging worries of the future and be attentive to the present.

Tom loved books. Specifically, he loved novels with the kind of characters you think about months later, characters that open up a space within you that you hadn’t known about before. Tom’s favorite characters felt compassion in their bones. They spoke to the beautiful experience of the unknowability of human life.

Tom loved live music. He and Candy travelled for concerts. He helped produce God only knows how many shows with the Forty Acres organization he cofounded. Those performances gathered people together to exalt in the creative potential of the moment.

Maybe all of this is why he was so captivated by this building. Probably he took more pictures of it than anything else that’s not a person. This chapel stood somewhere else for 120 years before we moved it here to Chapel Hill. It is a space consecrated over and over again by the gathering of generations of people we can’t know. These walls heard prayers and laments and hymns for decades before ours echoed through. This wood is seasoned like one of Tom’s old guitars, richer and warmer for the history that rippled through it, and drawing us into a present moment where the mystery of the past opens us to the mystery of the present, where our reality meets God’s.

God’s reality. That reality is particularly mysterious—acutely mysterious—to us today, and it was something that fascinated Tom throughout his life. The man who was known for being a terrific listener to his friends and family grounded himself in listening for God’s movement in the world. That mysterious depth that lies behind each person is a reflection of the primal mystery of the divine.

Divine mystery is an antagonist today. We always want to understand God. We want to say that everything that happens, even cancer, somehow has divine purpose behind it. But what we see, what we hear in the readings Tom chose for today, is that God’s power is manifest as love. Nothing, Romans says, including death, can separate us from the love of God.

A God of mystery who is insistently present with us in the form of love. I spent a lot of hours and drank more than a few pints of beer talking about this God with Tom. The conviction that divinity flows through each person and calls us to defend the dignity of each person… the conviction that the divine mystery calls us to listen steadfastly for God in our midst… this is the spirituality of Tom Fisher.

This was no accident. It was no affect that he put on. This was Tom. The man who worked for Civil Rights knew something of the sacred mystery of each person. The father of Morgan and Jess knew something of the beauty of possibility, the unfolding mystery of each child, and the love that allows them to thrive. The man who went to seminary before becoming a financial advisor knew something of the importance of letting each person decide who they are, of being prepared to act. The man who helped lead this church into existence knew something of patient listening and of the transfixing mystery that guides people of God. The photographs reflect the man who took them.

And so we are gutted today, because we have lost Tom. His steadiness, wisdom, and love were never more evident than in the months since his diagnosis, when Tom’s choices were guided by the value of the present, by his ability to find depth and love in a time freighted with the grim prospects of a dire disease.

More than anyone I’ve known, Tom led those he loved through the end of his life. He took care of us. He sat and talked frankly about the end of life. He told me stories of gratitude for time with Morgan and Jess and their families, of his delight in the people his children had become and the people they had married, stories of the magic of his grandchildren, of his sheer awe at the compassionate force of Candy’s love. Life, he knew, had been good.

So this hurts. And it will hurt. It is love’s dark insult to us. To love is to eventually be heartbroken. And Tom knew that love is simply the most important thing. He was right. So this hurts.

But those pictures…

The moments that Tom sought to capture are sacred, but they are not rare. Our days are infused with the potential for something new to happen, something more than we would imagine. This is the movement of the insistently loving God of mystery, the God who now bears Tom in the glory of divine memory and presence, working through the miracle of relationship to ensure that when we notice the depth of mystery in a seemingly ordinary moment, Tom will be with us. And we will feel gratitude, and we will feel pain. At the same time. There is no prescribed ratio of the two.

Those ordinary moments, when refracted through the prism of clear presence to the moment, are the kingdom of God. To be fully present in God’s creation, in this precise moment which is the only moment that is actually happening, is to see that the boundaries between us are not so clear. We will miss Tom, but we will feel Tom’s presence when we allow ourselves to be present, because Tom is, in a very real way, a part of us. All of this.. this life… is space held open by God so that we might intertwine in relationship, so that we might, acting from love, create beauty from the very possibilities that lie before us. I understand this better than I did before because I was given the tremendous gift of being Tom Fisher’s friend.

It is all a wildly improbable miracle, one in which we are now rightly grieving the loss of this man who was woven deeply into so many lives. Even in this painful moment, the beauty and mystery of Tom’s life draws us in like one of his pictures. We want to know more. We want another conversation. Another dinner.

This is the mark of a life well lived. Of a man who was deeply loved and who loved deeply. It is grace that intersected our lives with his, and it is grace that will allow us to know his presence in those future moments when the mysterious unknown of life speaks to us of something more. Something we can’t touch but can marvel at.

There is so much in those pictures. So much behind them. God knows we will miss Tom, and God knows we will feel him with us yet. It’s in the pictures.

AMEN

Summer Discussion on The Sermon on the Mount, Sundays at 10 AM

Through the summer, Sarah McGiverin and Paul Marvin will be leading a discussion of the Sermon on the Mount.  We will meet Sunday mornings before the Eucharist, 10:00 – 10:50.

Each week we’ll read a portion of the sermon and discuss it together.

Whether you’re an old pro at Bible studies or you’re brand new to the Sermon on the Mount, you are invited to join in the study.

Pee Wee Homes and Piedmont Patch Each Awarded Grants This Season

The Advocate’s two collaborative efforts, the Pee Wee Homes and the Piedmont Patch, have each been awarded grants this month.

The Pee Wee Homes at the Advocate has been awarded a $10,000 from the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina’s Mission Endowment Fund. This grant will allow us to meet the anticipated increased expenses of the project due to the particularities of our site, significantly the large oak trees. It will also help pay for building materials. Total budget for the project’s three homes and infrastructure now expected to be $160,000.

The Piedmont Patch at the Advocate is the recent recipient of a grant from the local New Hope Audubon Chapter, providing 10 bird boxes for bluebirds and nuthatches on the Advocate site. Visitors can see the new boxes in the from yard of the Advocate, and also north of the pond. In the fall, the New Hope Audubon Chapter will also donate and plant some shrubs and bushes to further invite these birds to find their homes with us.

We are so very grateful for this good support of our efforts to create an hospitable site for all.

 

 

Study of Hebrew Scripture Starting in September

Have you ever wanted to study the wonderful, diverse and rich Hebrew Scriptures more deeply, but you’ve found the cost  or time commitment of some programs prohibitive?  Beginning in September, the Rev. Lera Tyler is offering a nine-month study of the Hebrew Scripture, using as text: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible  (Fortress Press, Second Edition 2014) by John J. Collins.

Participants will meet at the Advocate weekly to study and reflect on the stories, poetry, and teachings of the Pentateuch, the Prophets, Psalms, Wisdom literature, and consider their relevance to us now.
If you are interested in exploring the possibility, please contact Lera Tyler. <lera.tyler@gmail.com>.

Creativity / Crafting Group, Every Other Thursday Evening Starting May 10

Join us every other Thursday night in the Chapel from 6:30 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. for evenings of sharing and crafting (and occasional meals). Whether you knit, write, weave, sing, play, paint, dance, bake, crochet, garden, or simply want inspiration and support to begin your own creative endeavors, all are welcome.

May 10th: Kickoff at the chapel
June 7th: Potluck (contact untothewoods@gmail.com. for location)
June 21st: Regular Meetup in the Advocate Chapel
July 5th: Regular Meetup in the Advocate Chapel
July 19th: Possible Potluck (contact untothewoods@gmail.com. for location)
[Knitwear Design & Photography by: Kerry Bullock-Ozkan. Model: Debbie Wuliger]

Glory Bees! A Piedmont Patch Project

On Friday, April 6 a hive of 12,000 bees were installed in their new hive on the north side of the Advocate Pond.

We can learn about bees, bee keeping, and the Advocate Church bees in particular, by following the blog, Glory Bees, found here.

 

 

Blog posts include:
An Introduction
The Queen
Pollen and Plants
New Digs!

A post for National Pollinator Week posted August 4)
Sugar Shakin (posted August 6)
Time to Treat (posted August 8)

For more about the Piedmont Patch, look here.

 

 

Readers Roundtable 2nd Wednesday at 7

IMG_0382The Readers Roundtable gathers the second Wednesday of each month to talk about a book selected by those who participated in the Roundtable the previous month. Books are largely fiction, but are not limited to fiction.
Books so far have included Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Mary Doris Russell’s The Sparrow, and Mary Oliver’s Thirst, Leif Enger’s Peace Like a River, Wendell Berry’s A Place on Earth,

Each month the book is announced at least three weeks in advance and the conversation is open to everyone and their friends.

In the season ahead, here are the books that will be discussed:

Akata WitchOut of the Silent Planet,  Nightingale, and TransAtlantic.

Details coming soon!

For further information, contact Paul Marvin. pmarvin64@gmail.com

Whether you’ve read the book or not, all are always welcome to join in the conversation!

The Piedmont Patch Project

img_7929The Piedmont Patch Project: Restoring Native Flora and Fauna, One Patch of Piedmont at a Time

The people of the Episcopal Church of the Advocate have a dream. Since moving onto our scruffy 15-acre site in 2014, we have been working to transform it into a place of hospitality, worship, and contemplation, and a regional resource for collaborative social ministry and the arts. In 2015, The Advocate began collaborating with individuals and organizations outside the church to host three “tiny homes” on our site, for individuals who would otherwise be homeless (PeeWeeHomes.org ). Now we are beginning a second collaboration, the Piedmont Patch Project, to restore native flora and fauna displaced by the rapid urbanization surrounding the property, and to cultivate keepers of Creation.

The Piedmont Patch project will transform five acres of our site into a food-producing and natural habitat, create a network of involved neighbors and provide numerous opportunities to educate and engage people of all ages and backgrounds. We believe that in deepening connections with creation and with our community, mindfully tending and keeping the land and teaching others to do the same, we will honor God.

20170628_195951We imagine the Advocate Pond and grounds enriched with diverse well-adapted native plants that will attract and nurture an array of wildlife, including butterflies, bees, birds, frogs, turtles, and small mammals. Surrounded by rapid urbanization, the Church of the Advocate’s acreage can serve as a sanctuary for homeless wildlife increasingly displaced by bulldozers, asphalt, and concrete. Over time, such native plantings require less maintenance than traditional ornamental plantings, most of which do not meet the needs of native wildlife.

The project has an educative component, engaging school children and graduate students and inviting all who are responsible for patches of Piedmont land to learn how to create vibrant native sanctuaries that serve rather than harm God’s creation. Ideally, we can lead other congregations and other neighborhoods to adopt this concept of native sanctuaries, building refuges of hope for native wildlife and havens of peace and beauty for humans one patch of piedmont (and beyond!) at a time. The Project will also include education on invasive exotic species and their removal — why it is important, how it contributes to sustainability.

IMG_8563The Piedmont Patch Project is grounded in a belief that the environment and our natural resources will be better sustained, and even thrive, as organizations and individuals work to cultivate one patch at a time. The Project is envisioned as a collaborative effort of the church, the town, the NC Botanical Gardens, and individuals with knowledge and skills to share, such as Cathy Bollinger of The Piedmont Gardener.

We hope the Piedmont Patch Project (like the Pee Wee Homes Collaborative) will serve as prototypes that can be scaled and replicated in a variety of church, public, and private settings.

Breaking News!!! The Advocate Awarded Stewardship of Creation Grant from The Episcopal Church!

Here’s and article about native and non-native wildflowers and bees.